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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Default cypress planked walls

    What is the best way to cover cypress planked walls?? We are restoring a house built in 1924 and do not want to use sheetrock. Is there another material we could use to cover the walls with before hanging wallpaper?? Any advice would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: cypress planked walls

    are you sure you want to cover them? if it is that they have darkened with age maybe look at refinishing them. valuable thing you have there

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sand Springs, OK
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    Default Re: cypress planked walls

    Sheet rock is about all you can find unless you want to hang paneling, furniture grade plywood would give you a wallpaper smooth surface but it's going to be as expensive as sheet rock.

    I agree with Havanagranite, you have a valuable wall treatment, covering it would be a shame.
    Debby in Oklahoma

  4. #4
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    Oct 2007
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    Default Re: cypress planked walls

    Quote Originally Posted by debbysewn View Post
    Sheet rock is about all you can find unless you want to hang paneling, furniture grade plywood would give you a wallpaper smooth surface but it's going to be as expensive as sheet rock.

    I agree with Havanagranite, you have a valuable wall treatment, covering it would be a shame.
    Thanks for your advice. Unfortunately we need to cover these walls. My grandfather built this house and got most of the wood from other structures being torn down. Some of the planks have stenciling on them and some are painted.

  5. #5
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    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: cypress planked walls

    Quote Originally Posted by jagsryder View Post
    Thanks for your advice. Unfortunately we need to cover these walls. My grandfather built this house and got most of the wood from other structures being torn down. Some of the planks have stenciling on them and some are painted.
    only you can make that call, but paint and others can be sanded off but if this isn't an option, then you could cover it with half inch drywall and finish as normal. or you might think of removing these boards and then putting up the drywall, the price you can probally sell these boards for will probally pay for your drywall, good money in salvaged wood these days especially if the cypress boards have some width to them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Fayette County, Ohio
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    5,560

    Default Re: cypress planked walls

    You may want to check cypress pricing on line, you might have a **** mine there.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  7. #7
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    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: cypress planked walls

    all that yuk says may be true but that was always done on the outside of the studs not the inside, when done on the inside it was done as a finished product not structural.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
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    Default Re: cypress planked walls

    I have to agree with Yuk's post. A common covering used over the planking was called painter's cloth. Painters cloth was particularly well suited because it didn't allow paint to soak through.
    Jack
    Last edited by JLMCDANIEL; 02-08-2008 at 11:06 AM.
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    6

    Default Re: cypress planked walls

    Quote Originally Posted by YukYuk View Post
    Interior plank sheathing, sometimes planking sometimes shiplap was a common construction method. It was rarely intended to be displayed as exposed wood. Often it serves as a structural support for example balloon framed walls which do not have diagonal bracing, it actually provides sheer strength and structural support.

    In the late 1800s/early 1900s products like beaver board were invented and sometimes this was installed overtop to provide a smooth wall papering surface but usually only for the slightly more expensive homes of that era or kit or plan homes, company built homes, government works projects, and government contracted or sponsored housing where certain materials cost and availability overcame the labor and materials cost of plaster & either wire lathe or firring strips and traditional wood lathe and plastering. Beaverboard was sort of like masonite, you'll often see a similar material used on the backing of cork faced thumbtack boards.

    Prior to that, and still afterwards, in lieu of beaver board or similar (or sometimes still used overtop of beaver board), these planked walls were often first dressed with a cheese cloth like or open weaved muslin like cloth with stronger canvas like fibers, which was first soaked in a casien or hide glue solution and tacked for support on the walls to dry and create a web finish to dry and cure. Then wall paper soaked or booked with a similar adhesive base was applied overtop. Some wall paper products later produced had a thicker base with this cheese cloth type web already laminated to it. Sometimes more substantial and profiled wall coverings like lincrusta were used which may or may not have been painted. Sometimes, especially early 1900s as metal lathe showed up in the US, it and a light plaster was dressed overtop.

    There was also a method using a sort of canvas dressing which was soaked in a plaster like substance that also included hide glue which was tacked up, that was later skimmed with lime plaster. Your window casings, door casings and baseboard offset might provide a clue as to if any of the mentioned coverings might have been in place, as would the possibility of some plaster/lathe ghosting marks or swirls.

    For those on a budget, and especially during the depression era it was not uncommon for folks to salvage materials, several "works" projects during the depression era also utilized salvaged materials.

    You'll also find this is how planks were finished off in converted attic spaces and larger homes that were split up into smaller living units as boarding houses or apartments during the housing shortages during the second World War.

    Removing old adhesives and using compatible materials important if you're looking to repeat the original look.

    Whatever you decide to do (advance your moulding profiles, etc. to hold drywall or blue board and plaster, install a thinner paperable flat wall surface like a present day beaver board substitute, laminate the cloth web and wall paper, use a reinforced wall paper, or lincrusta) keep in mind that the wood planks or shiplap is certainly most likely serving a structural purpose.

    If some of the planks were recycled from other homes, they may have been flipped before your grandfather installed them. You might encounter cassien or milk paint, white wash, lead based paint, etc. on those recycled boards grandfather scavanged. Milk paint or cassien paint (and adhesives based on hide glue or cassien glue) removal offers its own special challenges.

    Some historical covenants on older homes prohibit covering these plank walls with plaster or wall board, and one is restricted to restoring using the reinforcing fabric and glue and re-wall papering. I'm sharing that information, since many here may not be familiar with that vintage construction, and not be familiar with the more traditional wall covering methods of interior plank sheathing or interior shiplap.

    Thanks for all the great advice. When we removed the old wallpaper the walls were lined with cheesecloth. We do want to restore it to it's orginal state so it sounds like we need to go with the muslin. Thanks!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Georgia
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    44

    Default Re: cypress planked walls

    If you really want to wallpaper,I think that sheetrock is your best bet.Why don,t you want to use it?It is probably the cheapest method.If you just want to spend more,you could install lathe and plaster.But why?

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