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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    6

    Default Sump Discharge Line Problem

    Summary:

    Sump discharge line split under poured concrete patio, 8 inches below grade. How do I replace it?

    Details:

    I have a sump discharge line that is made of what appears to be stiff rubber. The sump pump connects to the "hose" with hose clamps. The discharge line runs vertically up the wall and makes a 90 degree bend, courtesy of a white plastic barbed fitting (and hose clamps). The dicharge line then runs horizontally through the cinder block wall, under the poured concrete patio and presumably connects to a french drain in the side yard of my property.

    The problem is that 15 inches inside the horizontal run (from the pump side) is a large split in this hose. My sump is relatively dry and I have actually never heard the pump run (it works though). My concern is that if the french drain backs up, water will pour out of this split right along the exterior wall of the house and/or when the sump pump discharges water it will do the same thing. I already have mold and effluorescence on the block wall in this immediate area in what otherwise is a very dry basement. Of course I could reroute the sump discharge line but I would still be concerned about the water from the french drain.

    How can I replace this section of line if I don't want to disturb the patio on top? Is there a way to locate the line on the other side of the patio to minimize the digging required? What would be the best replacement material, pvc or the same type of hose?

    Any and all advice would be appreciated! Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Sump Discharge Line Problem

    Well thanks for the reply! Unfortunately I don't read that language LOL. Thanks for the effort! I'll wait for another reply!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Sump Discharge Line Problem

    Phil, that first response would be a spammer. TOH has been having extreme problems with them for the last week.

    I'm not sure if a "trenchless" company could help or not, but they might be worth a try. If you'd rather save yourself the expense and try replacing the line yourself, then locate the line where it exits the patio and dig up about 3' of it. Cut the line then slide a piece of metal conduit over the line and use the conduit to bore a new hole back to the foundation wall. This should work reasonably well, as long as your soil isn't full of big rock and the run isn't over 10' to 12', otherwise the boring will be lot's of fun. I've used this method to tunnel under 5' and 6' wide walkways for setting sprinkler lines and running conduits to exterior locations.

    Once you've got the new tunnel, run a better quality pip, such as PVC instead of what sounds like black poly pipe which is similar to PEX. Good luck, and let us know how it goes.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Sump Discharge Line Problem

    Thanks for the reply. I kind of figured that the one reply was spam but I didn't want to offend anyone on the off chance it was someone trying to help.

    Thanks for the davice. I had kind of decided to do just what you said except for the conduit part. It was my thinking that there should already be a bore there where the other pipe was laid but I guess it may collapse when I pull the old out which would neccessitate the conduit approach. I also toyed with connecting a new pipe to the old and pulling that through as I remove the old. we'll see how it goes and I will post the results! Thanks again

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Sump Discharge Line Problem

    The conduit isn't for a collapsing hole, it's to "cut" the new hole slightly larger so that you can get a new pipe in place. You won't be able to just yank out the old or thread a new one in as you've described because of the compaction and friction of the soil on the existing pipe. The other reason to use the conduit over the old line is that the old line will act as a guide and will line up perfectly with the hole in the foundation and existing lines. Once you've enlarged the hole, THEN you can probably attach a new pipe to the old and draw it through, just be sure that the conduit you've used is the same size as the coupler used to connect the old line to the new or you won't be able to pull it through the tunnel. This is also a concern for the hole in the foundation, it's got to be large enough to pass whatever size implement or pipe you're intending to pas through it.

    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Sump Discharge Line Problem

    Ahhhhh!!! Gotcha! I see what you're saying. I had originally thought that I would go from the foundation side with the new pipe so as not to have to worry about lining up the hole, but I see your way would be better in that the hole would be larger and it would make the installation of the replacement that much easier. Thanks for setting me straight.

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