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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2

    Question basement floor being wet

    Does any one have suggestions on this problem. We just had a bad rain storm, but prior to that had a good amount of snow. Our basement gets small puddle of water. I am moving the tile to see if there are any cracks on the floor. So far I am 1/2 done but no cracks on the floor. The water does not to see come from the wall but the walls has drywall and painted. I am planning to use dry lock paint? for the floors . I think they are meant for the walls. Someone at homedepot stated that his mother did this. Any thoughts on this? My next plan is to make the down spout away from the house. We have a french drain system but it does not seem to do the trick. I guess a sump pump will be the last resort. But prior to pump, will try to grade the lot.

    Thanks

    Roulay

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,775

    Default Re: basement floor being wet

    Quote Originally Posted by Roulay View Post
    Does any one have suggestions on this problem. We just had a bad rain storm, but prior to that had a good amount of snow. Our basement gets small puddle of water. I am moving the tile to see if there are any cracks on the floor. So far I am 1/2 done but no cracks on the floor. The water does not to see come from the wall but the walls has drywall and painted. I am planning to use dry lock paint? for the floors . I think they are meant for the walls. Someone at homedepot stated that his mother did this. Any thoughts on this? My next plan is to make the down spout away from the house. We have a french drain system but it does not seem to do the trick. I guess a sump pump will be the last resort. But prior to pump, will try to grade the lot.

    Thanks

    Roulay
    If the walls are dry and the water seems to be coming up through or around the floor , IMHO a sump well would be the most logical choice.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3

    Default Re: basement floor being wet

    You may have a plugged or partialy plugged french drain maybe a tree root??

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,915

    Default Re: basement floor being wet

    With puddling the problem as opposed to general flooding it would seem that you have a level(non-sloped)floor. In that case a sump pump isn't going to solve your particular problem. In the first place there isn't supposed to be water getting into the house so that's where I'd begin looking for a solution. Site grading is your first line of defense against water. It diverts the surface water away before it gets to your house. It may not look pretty but you're better off with more slope than what most homes have. French drains take care of water that makes it into the soil; your second line of defense. These work well provided they are done correctly which many aren't. The perforated drainpipe should be wrapped in a silt blocking cloth made for that purpose. Many people stop there but that should really be surrounded by gravel(1/2 inch of larger)for six or more inches on 3 sides; the bottom should lay on the ground. The gravel gives water an easy non-clogging path into the drain and the hard bottom doesn't let water easily flow below the drain where it can seep furthewr down. Another common mistake is feeding gutter downspouts into the french drain. Downspouts should be piped away seperately. If yours are unpiped consider how and where they drain. Unpiped downspouts concentrate a lot of water onto(then into)a small area of soil which can retain only so much water. This hazard usually shows up by leaking later and slower than direct water entry because the soil takes time to saturate, then takes more time to release the water slowly. The third(but most effective) line of defense is waterproofing of the below-grade areas. Your below grade walls as well as the edges of the slab/foundation they rest on should have a waterproofing material applied from the outside. Putting waterproofing on the inside just keeps the water in the walls and is more a patch than a fix. Personally I've never seen it work for more than a few years at best though some swear by it and I won't argue the point. A leaking slab is much more of a problem since you can't really get to it's exterior surface. Let's hope that isn't your problem but if it is there are special floor paints/sealers made to help. The bare concrete floor(you'll have to take up those tiles for this stuff)usually has to be thoroughly dry before applying so you may have to wait for a dry spell. There may be newer and better products out there in this area so check with a real paint store(ie Sherwin Williams, ICI, etc), not a big-box type store.

    OK you tried all this to no avail. There are a few companies who promise(and actually deliver!)a dry basement everytime. Most of their interior systems consist of some kind of permanantly constructed perimeter drain where baseboards would go and an outlet or pump to take that water away. In most cases they will do what I mentioned above and may or may not install the interior system as they see fit. The ones I have in mind are easy to find and offer a substancial gaurantee(such as lifetime!)so I won't name them here. They usually aren't the cheapest since they're usually quite comprehensive but what a dry basement is worth to you is probably more than that cost.

    FYI: For a short while I worked on a factory building that was situated atop of six groundsprings, and one building had a full basement level. Now I thought that wasn't very smart with so much water already at the surface but the architect's engineer's said their duolithic(two piece)combinbed wall/slab pours sealed at the center joint were totally waterproof. They were so confident in their prowess that they designed the floor to be dead level and made no provision for a sump pump! When it rained the place flooded to the tune of several inches of water so the contractor decided to cut a hole and install a sump pump at the far end. What this statewide outfit didn't consider was they hadn't built this floor as level as they were supposed to and they ended up with a sump pump at the high end of the floor! Plus it ran all the time because they had broken the integrity of the floor when they cut the hole so water seeped into the pit constantly from the springs the building was sitting on. With such stupidity as was rampant there, I made it a priority to get another job anywhere else as fast as I could and I did. I never found out how or if they resolved the water issue but the factory still stands and was in operation for several years before the company went under. Maybe they did as the contractor did and had a couple of guys with squeegees pushing the water from to low end to the sump pump at the high end whenever it rained. Maybe the company went broke because they had to repair or replace the water ruined machinery and replace the sump pump so often? I don't know. Honest injun, this is yet another sad but true story I've personally seen of just how bad things can get in the world of construction, which is why you should always thoroughly check out whoever you plan to use when calling in outside help, and remember: If it sounds too good to be true then it probably is!

    MC
    Last edited by Mastercarpentry; 02-10-2008 at 12:34 AM. Reason: spelling

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: basement floor being wet

    I would try to take the ground water away first. Most problems are caused buy ground water. Remove the ground water and remove the problem. There might also be a problem with the water comming up from the ground. Hydrostatic pressure is very great and hard to stop. If you find a crack in the floor you should fill is with hyrdrolic cement. it is the only product that will stop water because it expands when it cures. After you have filled the cracks, then you can seal the floor with a paint or other type of sealer. Hope this helps you in your problem!

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