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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2

    Default Original Bath Fittings

    I am desperate to keep my old fixtures, at a minimal cost if possible. I have a 1922 house with wonderful 1922 original bathroom fittings, porcelain sink faucets. I had a frozen hot water shut off and a free turning cold. I got a plumber who removed the old fittings which appeared to be 3/8 ths. However when he went to install the flexible hose it was a smidge too big to screw on under the sink. He went and got a different company and the same thing happened. He has left now, and I have no water to my sink. Also the interior stems to the faucets, the cold has gotten stripped where the washer goes. We went to a local plumbing store that once could get us the replacement parts. They told us they are no longer made but we could pay about $150 and have it made. Is there some place that still might carry these parts? I love my fixtures, and have spent 2 days looking at faucets, and also on line and I am not thrilled with any.

    Thanks,

    dresser

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,824

    Default Re: Original Bath Fittings

    Because of the odd size your faucets may be imports and metric. Did you save the old supply lines?If you did and the nut is removable you may be able to use the nut with new supply lines.
    You could try taping the stem for a slightly larger screw to hold the washer. You'll have to watch the head size. or the hole can be filled and re-drilled and threaded.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Original Bath Fittings

    Hi You mentioned filling and re driling, what is the recommended for fillimng the whole?

    Thanks,
    Dresser

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,824

    Default Re: Original Bath Fittings

    There is a rod that you can use on non-ferrous metal, and for the life of me I can't remember the name. I picked up some at the Woodworking show. You insert a steel screw in the hole, heat the unit with a propane torch until touching the rod to it the rod melts (sort of like solder tinning) when it cools you unscrew the steel screw, the rod metal bonds with the brass but not the steel and you have a new threaded hole. I'll see if I can find the name or maybe someone on here has seen it. It is advertised for aluminum brazing but works on all non-ferous metals. http://www.aluminumbrazingrod.com/index.html

    Not sure where you are located but if you san get to one of the Woodworking Shows you can see it demoed. http://thewoodworkingshows.com/
    Jack
    Last edited by JLMCDANIEL; 02-11-2008 at 12:15 AM. Reason: Found name
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

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