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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    17

    Default Denim vs. Fiberglass bats in basement remodel

    I'm filling standard stud bays in a basement with typical poured concrete walls.
    Does anyone know how these two compare?
    I know that denim will cost more and has better acoustic dampening.
    Which handles moisture better?
    Which has better R value?
    Anything else?

    Part Two-
    Is it necessary for me to insulated the joist spaces in the ceiling for acoustic reasons?
    The basement space will be a TV room, but the area above is a rarely used foyer.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: Denim vs. Fiberglass bats in basement remodel

    Part one.....I would look at foam insulation rather than fiberglass or denim in a basement.

    Part two.....
    Personal preference, but I would insulate the basement ceiling for accoustical reasons even if it is only a foyer above.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Denim vs. Fiberglass bats in basement remodel

    I'm interested in denim because it is 85% recycled material. Spray foam is petroleum based and therefore antithetical to my intentions. Soy based spray foam is better, but it's more expensive than bats and would require me to subcontract.
    So it's still denim vs. fiberglass.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Denim vs. Fiberglass bats in basement remodel

    Having zero exposure to denim insulation I can't speak about it from personal experience. I have only recently investigated this material for insulation as it was highlighted on a TV program months back.

    From the information I've been able to gather it seems to have comparable R value to fiber glass bat insulation with similarities to cellulose. In this case cotton being the base material boric acid is introduced as the fire retardant , fungi, mildew, insect repellent and some binder such as polyolefin. This may end up with ratios of 85% cotton , 10% boric acid and 5% polyolefin or other ratios and binder materials depending on manufacturer.

    The claim is that if it does become wet it can be dried and reused without mildew issues because of the boric acid.

    One thing is since it's not commonly available .... especially in this area ... I suspect it may be premium priced.

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