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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,836

    Default Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    From the United States Environmental Agency, a group not funded to produce a desired result.

    "Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas produced by the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. Air pressure inside your home is usually lower than pressure in the soil around your home's foundation. Because of this difference in pressure, your house acts like a vacuum, drawing radon in through foundation cracks and other openings. Radon may also be present in well water and can be released into the air in your home when water is used for showering and other household uses. In most cases, radon entering the home through water is a small risk compared with radon entering your home from the soil. In a small number of homes, the building materials (e.g., granite and certain concrete products) can give off radon, although building materials rarely cause radon problems by themselves. In the United States, radon gas in soils is the principal source of elevated radon levels in homes."

    Or should we tear down all house built with anything mined and stop taking showers.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    East coast, USA
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    ***, you guys are hard on the ladies on this site.

    Buildclean.org is spending a ton of money on two studies on granite countertops, plus an upcoming in home testing effort.

    Sounds like someone is worried about granite countertops. They have sponsors in the stone industry and a very impressive website including a long list of studies.

    Jack, I couldn't help but notice the big red "rarely" in your post. And we should not tear down houses, we should learn not to tear down information we don't like.

    Nothing wrong with testing to prove or disprove this issue is there?

    http://buildclean.org

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,836

    Default Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    That's O.K.,it took her 22 days to read it. Slow readers always need to get the last word in. By the way we love the ladies.
    Jack
    Last edited by JLMCDANIEL; 03-13-2008 at 05:26 PM. Reason: Number of days
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    west central new jersey
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    by reading some of the answers, it seems that a few people do not realize that granite can trigger a responce on a radiation servay meter. the different types of granite can show different amounts of radiation coming from the stone, it depends on where it is quarried. There are some of the other things in your house that could also register on a servay meter, one is your smoke detector, the glow in the dark numbers on your wrist watch face.

    If you are concerned call some one at your local Office of Emergency Management (new name for the old Civil Defence people)and see if they have the time to come out and servay your granite or if they will loan you a servay meter to do it your self, But you will STILL NEED SOMEONE TO INTERPIT THE READINGS.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia
    Posts
    3

    Smile Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    Hey-as with all things natural, there may be unwanted elements in the stone. My first move would be to study the source for your material. Geologists are a friendly bunch, and are usually more than willing to share information with people. If it's a larger deposit, you can bet there is information out there. I would start with local colleges and universities and work from there. If it's from the U.S., the USGS will also be a valuable resource. I'm sure other countries have something similar to our geological survey. And finally, if you're worried about any effects that previous exposure may have, talk to a pulmonologist or an environmental health spe******t. Good luck!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,836

    Default Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    I just don’t like junk science or studies performed with a pre-decided conclusion. Radon is just about every where it comes out of the soil as well as quarried products. Perhaps they should do a study to see how much exposure you get setting in you lawn chair or attending a baseball game.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Anahiem, CA
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    If you are concerned about the granite you selected being contaminated with radon, there are radon test kits you can purchase.

    The claim that there is radon in granite is a bit misleading. Preliminary findings show that some (maybe 5%) of the slabs will have too much radon. This does not mean that all slabs have it.

    Check your slabs, make sure it is safe and enjoy your granite countertop.

  8. #28

    Default Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    Information on Radon in counter tops. Also visit our main site for other FAQs.

    Inspection for Seattle, Wa area.

    Radon in counter tops is not a worry, call us for an in home test. Mention this site and get $45.00 off 48hr Radon inspection testing services.

  9. #29

    Default Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    And then there is this.

    http://www.khou.com/topstories/stori....da1f6698.html

    A physicist says we need to test all countertops, as have most of the studies done on this subject.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Bronx
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Radon in Granite Countertops

    In what seems to be a genuine concern of the effects of radon emissions in residential homes. A certain website from a non-profit organization out of Houston has made it a point to imply without scientific proof, that natural stone could be a major contributor of radon in a household.

    The allusion that seems to be made, that natural stone installed in your home is dangerous to your health is raised repeatedly on the website and in a recent local Houston TV news program.
    It’s interesting to note that the two major contributors of this non-profit organization are manufacturers of engineered stone. One of those contributing manufacturers has a marketing executive on the board of directors of this particular organization.

    From what may be perceived on the surface as perhaps another “going green” ad campaign, seems to be a different slant on the ongoing battle of the engineered stone manufacturers against natural stone.

    Keep in mind that granite as does most natural components found in building material, allows vapors to pass through them that might contain trace amounts of radon. There are very small amounts of uranium found in trace minerals such as biotite in some natural stones. When quarried if a large cluster of biotite is exposed the result initially would be a radon reading. However, once a piece of granite or natural stone exposed to a large amount of uranium rich mineral in the ground is removed from the source and exposed to the air, the radon vapor transmission would weaken drastically and then dissipate. Simply put, think of natural stone as a very dense sponge that allows water, air and yes radon to pass through the stone. Once the stone is removed from the source of radon (the earth) the stone has no radon to filter through it.
    We do endorse Radon testing but to allude that natural stone is a main contributor seems ludicrous.

    Here are some facts about Radon:

    WHERE DOES RADON COME FROM?

    Radon comes from the natural radioactive decay of radium and uranium found in the soil beneath the house. The amount of radon in the soil depends on complex soil chemistry, which varies from one house to the next. Radon levels in the soil range from a few hundred to several thousands of pCi/L. The amount of radon that escapes from the soil to enter the house depends on the weather, soil porosity, soil moisture, and the suction within the house”.

    HOW DOES RADON GET INTO THE HOUSE?

    “Houses act like large chimneys. As the air in the house warms, it rises to leak out the attic openings and around the upper floor windows. This creates a small suction at the lowest level of the house, pulling the radon out of the soil and into the house.( Just as natural stone filters radon emission as mentioned before.) You can test this on a cold day by opening a top floor window an inch. You will notice warm air from the house rushing out that opening; yet, if you open a basement window an inch, you will feel the cold outside air rushing in. This suction is what pulls the radon out of the soil and into the house. You might think caulking the cracks and the openings in the basement floor will stop the radon from entering the house. However, scientific studies show, it only takes enough unsealed cracks or pin holes in the caulking to equal a hole 1/2" in diameter to let all the radon in. It is unlikely that caulking the accessible cracks and joints will permanently seal the openings radon needs to enter the house. The radon levels will still likely remain unchanged.
    Fortunately, there are other extremely effective means of keeping radon out of your home. Throughout the country, several million people have already tested for radon. Some houses tested as high as 2,000-3,000 pCi/L; yet, there hasn't been one house that could not mitigate to an acceptable level. The difference in reference to natural stone is that one the stone slab is removed from the source and exposed to the atmosphere the radon is vented in the same way ventilation of a house mitigates the radon emissions in the soil.

    Levels of radiation from granite products, which technically are measurable, are in fact, small fractional values of established thresholds for environmental safety. The truth of the matter is that granite is a safe product. It’s been used for thousands of years and the relationship between granite and radon has been studied for years and years. How safe is granite? There have been mathematical models developed that show that one could live in an all-granite home or building, including sleeping on granite, for an entire year and still be within very safe levels of exposure.


    --------------------------------------
    Josveek Huligar
    Huligar Stone Restoration
    proud member of the NSRA
    Last edited by Joh; 05-22-2008 at 06:31 AM.
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