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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    1

    Default Just one...well...a headboard....

    OK, it's hard to narrow down, since we decided that we could finish the professional remodel that was mostly completed by the professinals 5 years ago. So far...we still have backsplash tile to complete in our kitchen...any women out there that have takled that project? I may give it a try if it's not tooo difficult!
    We have ceiling molding to install, swapping out oak woodwork for maple in our front entry, replacing all interior doors to match the new trim...and (drum roll)...the project I would choose for valentine's day....
    A headboard for our bed!
    Since I'm covering it, what is the best thickness of plywood to use? Anyone done this project before? My husband just may get started if he has enough info on thickness of plywood, type of saw to use to cut it and how to attach it to the bed. Any help?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sand Springs, OK
    Posts
    467

    Default Re: Just one...well...a headboard....

    Half inch to 3 quarter plywood is all you need for a covered head board.

    as for standing it up you can do one of 2 things, mount it to the wall using a cleat or you make 2 vertical legs and then bolt it to the "Hollywood" frame.

    The cleat is made with a 1 by or 2 by six cut in half along the length of the board with the blade of the table saw cut at an angle. You attach the one half with the angled edge pointing up sloping toward the wall keeping it level so it looks like an N with this side of the n being the wall. Screw it into the studs. Then the other part with the angle pointing down and the angle sloping it toward the headboard.

    I'd send you pictures but my table saw took legs.

    For added stability maybe you should do both.

    If you need a place to put hooked rails then use the table saw to put a dado cut in the legs wide enough for the hooks to get in it. Then lay it on it's side with the hooks on it's side on top of it, and mark the top of the crook of the hook screw in bolts through the dado for the hooks to slide over and hook on to.

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