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  1. #1
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    Dec 2007
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    Default Countertop economics

    We have a 2-tiered countertop. The counter on top of the cabinets (of course) and then behind it, another thin tier (sitting on the half-wall) that goes out to the living room.

    I was originally thinking to cut the half wall down to the height of the cabinets and run granite all the way across. Which would be less expensive? One piece that is wider? or keep the 2-tiers and have two separate granite pieces?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: Countertop economics

    very good question, this is where some companies make their money. they give you a square foot price, which always sounds good. then you add extra for the undermount sink and show some very nice edge profiles. the edge profile you choose can also make a big difference, (half bullnose is much cheaper than a triple waterfall or an ogee edge) then at what ever rate that shop is charging for that particular edge you are charged per foot of edge. so one flat counter top is going to cost less on the simple basis that you are going to have one third less edge profile. you also need to ask about how much per cutout and if you are getting an undermount how much for that and if they charge for drilling faucet holes.

    look at other jobs your granite company has done, talk to some of their past coustomers. granite is a very beautiful product from nature, if your choice of granite has any kind of movement it is good if you look at the complete slab or slabs and have them show you where they are cutting each piece so you can visualize what the finished pieces will look like.

    if I can be of any assistence let me know

  3. #3
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    Dec 2007
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    Default Re: Countertop economics

    I'd love to get a quote from you buy your all the way in North Florida (and I'm South FLa)

  4. #4
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    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: Countertop economics

    if I can answer any further questions you have about granite or the process in either the manufacturing of your tops or the installation, colors, etc. just let me know.

  5. #5
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    Dec 2007
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    Default Re: Countertop economics

    Okay. Question.

    With the cutout for the sink & the holes for the faucet... I'd also like a cutout behind that for a 6 inch backsplash (just right behind the sink & faucet). I already have the existing half-wall there and would remove all of it (except for right behind the sink). Is this do-able? or would it seriously compromise the strength of the granite?

    I thought about building a backsplash on top of the granite slab, but I need to install a disposal switch....

  6. #6
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    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: Countertop economics

    they make a disposal switch that is simply a button which can be surfaced mounted ontop of the granite that way you don't have to leave the wall. is your sink going to be a top mount or undermount? really don't need to leave backsplash behind sink if you are extending it out to a 36 inch counter top in that area. the only way water would be going out past that would be if you were turning your water on real high with high water pressure.

  7. #7
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    Dec 2007
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    Default Re: Countertop economics

    I would like to have a backsplash behind the sink. However, is it ?possible? to somehow attach the backsplash securely to the top of granite?

  8. #8
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    Nov 2007
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    Default Re: Countertop economics

    Quote Originally Posted by ohliger View Post
    I would like to have a backsplash behind the sink. However, is it ?possible? to somehow attach the backsplash securely to the top of granite?
    sure its possible the first thought that comes to my mind Is I would take a 3/8 diamond bit (the same one that I use to put fastners in the underside for an undermount sink) drill into the top and corresponding holes into the bottom of the splash and epoxy a metal dowel into the holes. I would try to think of something to make it decorative, so it isn't just a splash sitting in the middle of a counter top.

  9. #9
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    Dec 2007
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    Default Re: Countertop economics

    Okay, I like that idea. It is THE WIFE who requires a "pretty" backsplash to the sink, and if she doesn't get what she wants, I won't get what I want....

    A friend at work told me about a granite company that charges per square foot and linear foot edging, but then claims that there is no extra charge for cutouts (no limit)? Doesn't sound right, does it? Unless they charge extra up front on the square footage or edging, but my friend says that they gave him a good price... I suppose I'll check it out - it can't hurt...

    Any advice on what to look for as far as a good quality company or good quality work?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: Countertop economics

    Quote Originally Posted by ohliger View Post
    Okay, I like that idea. It is THE WIFE who requires a "pretty" backsplash to the sink, and if she doesn't get what she wants, I won't get what I want....

    A friend at work told me about a granite company that charges per square foot and linear foot edging, but then claims that there is no extra charge for cutouts (no limit)? Doesn't sound right, does it? Unless they charge extra up front on the square footage or edging, but my friend says that they gave him a good price... I suppose I'll check it out - it can't hurt...

    Any advice on what to look for as far as a good quality company or good quality work?
    you are right they aren't going to do an unlimited number of cutouts, thats not even reasonable considering the time it takes to cut, the price of daimond blades and the amount of work in protecting everything to make sure you don't make a mess. ask to look at work that they have done, and the reason to visit their shop is to look at work that they are turning out. they might hand pick whose tops you look at but the ones in the shop ready to go out are kind of hard to deny. run your hand down the finished edges, do they feel smooth are do they feel like a bumpy road? how do they fasten undermount sinks? (I drill in the bottom and epoxy fasteners in them, though there are other means to fasten them to countertops you want to make sure that your sink is going to be solid and not going to come loose in a month or so. (avoid fasteners that are epoxied straight to the rough bottom of the top ones that don't penetrate, they come loose) go to jobs they have done and look at their joints. speak to past coustomers and see if they come back if there was a problem. (things don't always go as they should sometimes problems develop but what matters is do they keep coming back till it is taken care of) trust your gut if you feel un at ease go somewhere else. with granite you are paying for the best and you should be able to expect to get the best both in craftsman ship and service

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