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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    1

    Smile Toilet flange, how high should it be?

    Ok, so how high should the toilet flange be from the subfloor/etc. Anyone have thoughts?

    Ours seems quite high and the new toilet doesn't it evenly on the flange (That's another problem though).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Our plumber told us that the bottom of the toilet flange should sit on top of the finished floor (tile, for example) So, I would say 5/16"

    And just to save someone else a potential headache and a bit of ribbing from a spouse, when you install a toilet flange, make sure that you line up the bolt holes so that you can actually install the toilet. Stupid me put the flange in so that the bolt holes were at about a 30 degree angle to the wall because I was so concerned about getting the height set properly. Best to buy the type that has a rotating metal ring attached and avoid the issue all together.
    Last edited by raburrell; 06-04-2007 at 11:23 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Florida
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Toilet flange, how high should it be?

    Quote Originally Posted by raburrell View Post
    And just to save someone else a potential headache and a bit of ribbing from a spouse, when you install a toilet flange, make sure that you line up the bolt holes so that you can actually install the toilet. Stupid me put the flange in so that the bolt holes were at about a 30 degree angle to the wall because I was so concerned about getting the height set properly. Best to buy the type that has a rotating metal ring attached and avoid the issue all together.
    While the rotating ring flanges are convenient for getting the closet bolt flanges in the right spot, you should always screw them into the floor if at all possible, so the metal flange is not stressing the PVC pipe. This still requires lining up the flange properly before even setting the height, so you can mark the spots to drill holes for the screws (or plastic inserts, if installing to a concrete slab). Once that is done, however, you can deal with the height issue while cementing it into the drainpipe, then just rotate the metal flange to line up with the holes/inserts. Be sure to use stainless screws to hold down the metal flange.
    Tom Stangl
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    Caveat: IANAC (I Am Not A Contractor) - I am simply a DIYer that tends to do a lot of research. Contact licensed Contractors/Architects/whatever for the final legal word on any advice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3

    Smile Re: Toilet flange, how high should it be?

    The closet flange should rest squarely on a surface even with the finished floor. If the finished floor is higher than the flange height (the most common problem) add flange spacers to fill in the difference. For more, click here.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Toilet flange, how high should it be?

    The flange should be attached with corrosion resistant fastners and rest firmly on the finished floor. If you are remodeling and working from the subfloor, then determine the type of finished floor you will be installing, i.e. total floor thickness. Shim the flange up so that it will rise above the subfloor the exact amount equal to the finished floor thickness plus the flange thickness. The shims must be corrosion resistance and non-compressible. Do not use wood shims.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Toilet flange, how high should it be?

    ...flange spacers to fill in the difference. For more, click here.[/QUOTE]

    Tom
    I checked your above referenced,
    ours is way too high. I'm not about to have it 1" above floor or jimmied, though. (This state's animal is the 2" cockroach you know!) So our water closet has become that, a closet until it can be fixed properly. That would be an awful thick floor, wouldn't it, to compensate for gap? I've been told the pipe has to be cut down. Any alternatives?
    When the commode rests on pipe, the front side touches the floor and the back is a good inch above the floor. Ugh.
    Thanks a million,
    kj

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