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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    near St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    166

    Default Re: table saw safety

    Hey, letís not pick on Norm. He was the interviewer. Heís not the one who pushed the wood through freehand. (I cringed when I saw that.) He was showing us how the cabinet installer did his work, not how Norm would recommend it being done. That said I wish Norm had said that this freehand method was not something for the average DIYer to do at home. (One of the guys I use to work with lost 3 fingers on his table saw freehanding.)

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: table saw safety

    If you notice, and are fans of the NYWS, Norm wears two different types of glasses. The ones he wears in the shop are true safety glasses. I didn't pay attention the ones he was wearing in this episode. His other pair are oval and not as square as his safety glasses.

    And the guy making the free hand cut.... didn't anyone else notice he was missing most of one of his thumbs?!?! That says a lot right there... in my humble opinion. I remember seeing Charlie Silva do the same job and make the same cut with a jig saw. A little safer and both cuts had to be cleaned up afterwards.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: table saw safety

    Without a doubt cutting a piece of molding on a table saw freehand is the most stupid thing I've ever seen and Norm should have stopped it from being aired. Let that piece of wood have a hidden knot and we'll see just how experienced lefty is....

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,558

    Default Re: table saw safety

    There are Two reasons why you don't see it being used by Tommy

    1] A Sawstop contractor saw was not available until recently, only the cabinet saw.

    and 2] the most important, Sawstop does not sponsor the program.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: table saw safety

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    There are Two reasons why you don't see it being used by Tommy

    1] A Sawstop contractor saw was not available until recently, only the cabinet saw.

    and 2] the most important, Sawstop does not sponsor the program.
    Jack
    And, accidents happen. I got in a fight with a tablesaw when I was highschool. Had I been following the safety advice of the instructor I'd have lost the tip of a finger. However, I was following the advice of a furniture maker and ended up only mangling the tip a bit, which fully recovered from the incident. IMHO, Norm's lng standing advice to "read and understand the operators manual and safety instructions, etc, etc ... " is really all that should be necessary. These are dangerous tools, if the operator doesn't understand and respect that, they have no business using them. I'm also a member of a local woodworkers group and one of our members experienced the same thing that asc2078 just described. Most of the major accidents that have been seen within the group came from operator error, fatigue, or just plain not paying attention to what's going on and the dangers associated with the equipment. All reasons that the operator shouldn't have been in the shop to begin with. I'm not speaking disparagingly of anyone or any tool, only trying to point out that a tool is just a tool, they're all dangerous in their own way, it is up to the user to know how to operate it safely to protect themselves from injury.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,558

    Default Re: table saw safety

    Sprucy's right. I've been a woodworker for many years. I make it a habit not to use power tools when I'm tired, when the power is on concentrate on that job only , and don't allow distractions in the shop. If some one comes over to chat we turn off the tools and sit down and chat. I have cut myself a few times with chisels and knives and that was usually due to stupid.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: table saw safety

    I made my first push stick about 2 weeks ago after watching Norms Show.The next day I was using it for the first time .I was concentrating on the push stick and I was not watching my left hand that was holding the wood..Needless to say I now have 5 stiches in my left index finger and a lot of pain. Be careful my friends , Saws are dangerous.Pay close attention while using them.
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  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    162

    Default Re: table saw safety

    Common sense & intuition play an important role in a wood shop, also. If a particular operation doesn't "feel right", trust your instincts & stop. Look for another way to perform the operation. There are a lot of ways to perform most tasks. Some are definitely safer than others.
    HTH

    Dave

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: table saw safety

    I agree 100% with Dave.

    If you don't feel comfortable doing ANY task, then pay someone to do it.Is your hand or a few fingers worth $100, $1,000 or $10,000???I know mine aren't. I've done my fair share of "silly" things but I'm comfortable doing them. As far as "unsafe" acts, I've seen tons of HVAC contractors who take the guard off of a circular saw to do plunge cuts for ducts and stuff. Talk about wielding a dangerous weapon, you can't set that thing down until the blade stops or it might run over someones foot!

    As an example:
    I would NOT get a 30' extension ladder to go up on my slate roof and work on my chimney OR my slate roof. I'll gladly pay someone $500 to do it!

    Now on a "normal" asphalt shingle roof with a "normal" pitch, I'm up on those all the time. My father-in-law lives in the woods and needs to clean his roof of debris twice a year.

    So there are two great examples of doing or NOT doing something.

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