+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    you would have to go to a drywall supply house. I live in the south east and here we have csr rinker and seacoast supply. if you look in the yellow pages under "drywall contractor supplies" you should find everything you need there. you will also find you can save a couple of dollars per sheet on your drywall and produts there

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    or rather products

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    Is it true the drywall can not touch the floor or ceiling when using resilient channel? I also read you can not hang anything on the walls or knock in any nails?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    Quote Originally Posted by anon1m0us View Post
    Is it true the drywall can not touch the floor or ceiling when using resilient channel? I also read you can not hang anything on the walls or knock in any nails?
    tape it to the ceiling just the same as you do in the corners. The drywall would be about a half inch from the floor just as normal then you use an accoustic caulk that you can buy at the same store as the resilient channel. the reason you don't want the drywall touching the floor is so it doesn't wick up water. and caulk won't act as a wick. and you can hang pictures on the wall using different anchor systems (they have a plastic plug that screws into the wall then a metal screw goes into that and you hang the picture) you just want to make sure that they arent into the stud but rather into the hollow part of the cavity

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    I am assuming that crown moldings and baseboards can be used as normal without short circuiting the resiliant channels.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    Quote Originally Posted by anon1m0us View Post
    I am assuming that crown moldings and baseboards can be used as normal without short circuiting the resiliant channels.
    yea. normally what I do is I use some adhesive like liquid nails on the back side so that you don't have to shoot as many nails in them and try to not use too long of a nail. because you use the adhesive the nail is basically just to hold it till the adhesive sets.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    If I use the channels and sound barriers, it will add an extra two inches to the wall. How do I build a new door frame for this? Is there a kit that fits the new door frame?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    Quote Originally Posted by anon1m0us View Post
    If I use the channels and sound barriers, it will add an extra two inches to the wall. How do I build a new door frame for this? Is there a kit that fits the new door frame?
    I would strip the old drywall off the wall and insulate with sound batt insulation, which is unfaced. then put up your resilient channel which is a little less than a half inch thick then hang your new sheetrock. this would only add a half inch past your door casing which you can simply nail another piece of 3/4 inch board cut to a half inch thick onto your door casing then trim out normally.
    Or you could do as I do and make your door casings from scratch. a little more effort but it also allows you to be a little more choosy about the wood and grain.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    Ah yes ... the term sympathetic vibration ... comes to mind.

    Here's a product of interest : http://quietsolution.com/html/quietr...FQHgPAodfgLYVg


    Another thing I've seen used is intumescent putty w****d around electrical boxes which is a source of noise infiltration.

    Example : http://www.jm.com/insulation/perform...putty_pads.pdf
    Last edited by canuk; 01-07-2008 at 01:05 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: Soundproofing a room

    Quote Originally Posted by asc2078 View Post
    THE BASIC SCIENCE OF SOUND PROOFING:

    Like a previous responder, I am not sure why one would want to soundproof a child's room. That being said, I will still expound a bit on the basics of sound proofing.

    As a professional in the business of designing sound systems and recording studios, I get a lot of questions on this subject. Before one tries the trial and error method of adding drywall, insulation, etc., they need to understand the basic science of sound.
    I will try to be as non-technical herein, as possible.

    To stop sound, one must first understand what sound is. Sound is essentially vibration. That emission of vibrating energy, must have something to bounce off of, or vibrate against. When any source emits sound, that sound is carried by whatever it can resonate against. The most common resonator or carrier of sound would probably be the air that we breathe. The sound vibrates or resonates upon the molecules in the air, until it reaches us and vibrates within our ears. That is why there is no sound in a vacuum. Unlike the explosive sound track in our favorite Star-Trek movie, there is actually no such sound in outer space. That is because there is no air there to carry the sound vibration.

    This basic scientific principal of sound teaches us something. The best way to stop sound is to create dead air space! A good example of this is the typical thermo-pane windows that we find in our homes. If one takes a single pane of glass, even heavy glass, and speaks toward one side of it, the sound vibration upon the glass, will still allow a person on the other side of that glass to hear it. When one uses two panes of glass, spaced slightly apart, creating dead air space between the two panes, the ability to hear is substantially reduced. This reduction in sound occurred when the sound vibration hit the dead air space between the two panes of glass. It no longer had something to vibrate against and/or act as a carrier.

    NOTE: The proper term for sound movement related to the subject of sound proofing, is "Sound Transmission." In the trade, different materials are rated by their "STC" rating. "Sound Transmission Class"

    To build a sound proof wall, one must adopt the same "dead air space," principal as a thermo-pane window. This is how we build sound proof walls for recording studios:
    Instead of a typical, single, 2"x 4" stud wall, we build two, 2"x 2" or 2"x 4," stud walls, adjacent and/or back-to back of each other, leaving a 1/2" to 1" of dead air space between the two walls. An inexpensive 1/2" monosote type fiber board backs the inside of the two walls, where they face the dead air space between each other. The walls are then packed with typical pink fiberglass insulation. The exterior of the walls are then finished to meet the decor like any other wall. When finished it looks like a typical stud wall, but thicker. In cases where there is already an existing stud wall, we simply build a second 2"x 2" wall, constructed the same way, spaced out 1/2" in front of the existing wall.

    Note: An important thing to remember when constructing back-to-back sound proof walls is not to place internal braces that anchor one wall to the other. If you do, it will again create a carrier for vibration.

    With all of this in mind, one must decide if they are going for total sound proofing or just sound reduction. On total sound proofing, one must also consider windows, doors, air ducts, ceilings, floors, everything. This is not easy to do in a typical residence. It does no good to build a sound proof wall if one has an air return duct acting like a giant intercom.

    Were I trying to simply make a bedroom more "sleepable" this is what I would do. I would first make sure the room had a thermo-pane exterior window(s) to reduce outside noise. I would then make sure the room had a solid-core, wood entry door, not a hollow masonite type of door. I would pack the walls with fiberglass insulation. I would also pack the floors if there was living space below. Hollow stud walls and hollow doors act as a sound baffle, similar to a speaker cabinet or a base drum. Filling the voids will decrease sound transmission. If it proves to be a problem, noise reduction baffles can be purchased for air ducts. These steps should be adequate for any residence.

    I hope this is helpful.

    DB
    I did comercial drywall and metal studs for about 20 years owning my own business for about 10 and we have installed countless either sound proof as well as sound controled rooms and I would hardly call drywall and resilient channel a trial and error method. there are methods layed out that are proven and reliable. there are several methods than can be used. I simply gave them some basics that they could do with their existing without complete tear out. because they said they eventually wanted to do all their rooms that way so I tried to give them the simplest and yet proven way of doing it much more wouldn't be cost effective to do all your rooms, would almost be cheaper to build new.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •