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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default Bathroom sink drain pipe & trap

    Hello,

    Recently my wife and I moved into my mother-in-laws home. This is only important because this sink went from rarely being used to being used constantly. The sink clogs up and drains very slowly. This drain/trap look really bad to me. Any opinions? Also looking for advice on how to replace if necessary. I think thWe live in the Southern Tier of NY State (upstate).

    Thanks for reading.

    Spencer
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Bathroom sink drain pipe & trap

    Is this the only fixture in the bathroom that's having an issue ?

    It looks as though there is a pop-up drain plug for the sink.
    That would be the first place to start. Remove the pop-up inside the sink drain it's likely coated with gunk ( technical term ). Once this out of the sink run the water and see if there is an improvement.

    If there is then it's a simple fix ----- if it doesn't then it's a little more involved.

    Some things come to mind if it's not the pop-up.

    Venting --------- poor venting ( air behind water ) will cause slow draining.
    If there hasn't been any changes done to the plumbing and the other fixtures like the bath not having an issue then this likely isn't the problem.

    The drain pipe in the wall ----- it may have a negative slope. In other words the drain pipe in the wall is sloped down and the water is trying to run uphill.

    Can't tell for certain if the plumbing are galvanized pipes. If they are it's possible they maybe caked up internally reducing the inside diameter which causes slow draining and clogs.
    You could try and snake this out to see if it can be opened up or it may need replacing ---- hard to say.

    Just some thoughts.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Bathroom sink drain pipe & trap

    Thanks for the reply. I have cleaned the stopper. The negative pressure might be a problem, but it has flowed well in the recent past. I tried to snake but I get stuck at the curve at the bottom. It is a pretty sharp turn. I am thinking the clog is in that area.

    Your thoughts are appreciated.

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Bathroom sink drain pipe & trap

    I tried to snake but I get stuck at the curve at the bottom. It is a pretty sharp turn. I am thinking the clog is in that area.
    Remove the " P " trap and with the snake use an aggresive circular motion while moving it back and forth to punch through the blockage.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Bathroom sink drain pipe & trap

    Canuk, thanks for the advice/suggestions. I was hoping to keep this cleaner, but my suspicion was that it would get a messy.

    Any suggestions on how to take off and re-attach the pipe with out doing too much damage.

    Would you replace the P with another one that has a "smoother" angle?

    Thanks again I really appreciate you taking time to comment and help me.
    Spencer

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Bathroom sink drain pipe & trap

    Your existing " P " trap simply unscrews from the tail piece ( the vertical pipe from the sink drain ) and the wall drain connector.
    Basically the tail piece connection is a compression fit with a large plasic nut ( if you will ) and the wall pipe connection has male ( external threads ) that the trap coupler nut tightens to.
    You may be able to loosen the couplers by hand or you may need a large pair of slip joint or Channel Lock or tongue and groove or pump pliers



    When you loosen these and ready to remove the trap have a pan underneath since there should be standing water inside..

    If you want you could replace the trap with one that has drain port on the bottom of the " P " which allows draining of the water first ----- that's up to you.

    Hope this helps.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

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