+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: ink on walls

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3

    Default ink on walls

    my kid drew on the walls with a pen a while ago and then I painted over it. The artwork that was done is still there even after putting on two coats of new paint. Is there a way to paint over this. I'm concerned with having to do the entire wall over again and it still being there? Seems that it should have covered it but it looks just like it did before I started painting!!! What am I doing wrong?
    Last edited by whiterice; 11-28-2007 at 08:02 AM. Reason: didn't read right

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: ink on walls

    you are doing nothing wrong. certain colors bleed through especially red. the easiest is to skim over it with a very thin coat of drywall mud let it dry, sand then repaint

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: ink on walls

    wouldn't hurt to use some stain blocking primer before the final coat of paint. Good luck!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: ink on walls

    Thanks for the quick reply everyone! I think I will do the mud thing since I also noticed a few irregualrities after I painted so I should probably do it all in one shot. Again, thank you all very much

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: ink on walls

    ink will not bleed through joint compound. the reason it bleeds through is not the ink but rather the sheen it can't bleed throuh a layer of mud, that is the one sure fix.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: ink on walls

    no disrespect intended but on what basis do you make this statement? I have over 20 years experience in the drywall trade and have dealt with this very subject on many occasions on jobs where people have wrote on the wallboard. and there is no substance that will come through the mud with the exceptions of mold. ink will not bleed through. if you can provide links to prove other wise I would be glad to read them.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,613

    Default Re: ink on walls

    Or just take the easy route and use several coats of pigmented shellac or aerosol lacquer. These products will seal most stubborn ink stains, the drawback is that they will also increase the sheen of the paint in the spots where the wall is treated. In the case of the shellac, you can easily spot treat until the stain quits bleeding, then give the entire wall a coat, then paint with your normal paint.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: ink on walls

    Holly Macrel Everyone!!! I figure this paint job will be there for about four years and hopeing the mud thing will work for that period of time...

    Here is my other issue... why can't they make a paint that doesn't take three coats to cover completely... I have put on ample paint and when it dries, it still has spots... I don't seem to put it on that way but by the end it seems to have sections that simply won't accept paint!?! m I am using a flat latex... Light brown Dutch Boy. It is supposed to be 1 coat coverage but this clearly is not the case. Does anyone have a specific brand that they use that can ensure to not waste my time??? I don't care if I have to spend $100 a gallon, I just want the stuff to do what it is supposed to do... sick of waiting for the paint to cure and find that I still have to put on another coat or do touch ups in spots that it just doesn't want to stick. It seems that the paint will stick to everything except the walls... I put low tac painter tape on the walls to trim out the ceiling (waivy walls so I dropped the ceiling color about 1/16 onto the walls to make them look straight) and it took the paint right off the walls... I don't think I should need to use a primer on an existing flat color.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    666

    Default Re: ink on walls

    Quote Originally Posted by whiterice View Post
    Holly Macrel Everyone!!!


    I have only used Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams from a paint store for a very long time and get two coat coverage with either one in flats and semi gloss.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,613

    Default Re: ink on walls

    Quote Originally Posted by whiterice View Post
    Here is my other issue... why can't they make a paint that doesn't take three coats to cover completely...
    As Kentvw has mentioned, any painting you do you'll be in for at least two coats, regardless of what the label says or the brand you use. I too only use name brands (Sherwin and Kelly Moore ) even using white on white requires two coats. Dark on light can take four or more to cover well.

    If you're having a problem with paint adhesion, it's probably a combination of things. First would be prep. Dust of vacuum walls painted in flat. This will remove surface dust/dirt that can cause problems. If there are large dirt spots or greasy areas, these spots will need to be washed carefully with TSP and may also require being sealed with a stain blocking primer or shellac. Use a TSP wash and rinse well with clean water for semi-gloss and gloss paints. After washing, allow the walls to dry thoroughly - can take a couple days depending on conditions. When you apply the paint, get on a good coat, but not so much that it runs/drips. After the paint is on the wall, go back over it with your roller several times to even it out. Depending on environmental conditions and the type of paint you're using, you can second coat in as little as 3 or 4 hours, but it's important that the paint be pretty darned dry before the second coat is applied, even if that means waiting over night.

    Every situation is different, the above guideline works in optimal conditions. As humidity increases and temperatures decrease, your paint drying times will also increase, requiring longer waits between coats.

    One last thing on clean walls. In high traffic areas where hands are always touching or animals rub, of in some cases the head area of beds (greasy hair gels ), there will be a grease film which will hamper the paints ability to adhere to the surface. These area, in addition to being washed with a TSP solution, will likely require being sealed with an oil based, stain blocking primer or a shellac.

    Hope some of this info helps.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •