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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    11

    Default sewer venting problem

    I'm having a problem lately with sewer gas venting into the bathroom from either the base of the toilet or the tub drain. It comes from the shower/tub drain only during use when the wind is from the South (vent is on the N slope of the roof). Also, from the toilet base when the wind is from the South. My guess is that the wind is pushing the gas back down the vent & into the system so I'm considering putting some sort of guard over the roof vent; maybe a 90 or 45 PVC elbow. I also notice a hint of the gas coming out of the bathroom heater vent when the furnace is on - no matter what the wind direction.

    This is a new problem this year after tiling over a hardwood bathroom floor this spring & insulating the attic last winter so I'm trying to make a connection with how these things might have contributed to this new problem. The toilet & tub sit higher now due to the tile & backer board but the toilet isn't leaking water so I don't think that's the issue. It is a claw foot toilet so the p trap is below the floor. I am on a septic system but don't have any issue with the drains not draining so I don't think it needs pumped. I just can't figure why it's only a problem when there is a South wind but can only think of the above mentioned fix of using the PVC elbow??

    Any other ideas would be appreciated.
    Last edited by bryan; 11-24-2007 at 01:11 PM. Reason: grammar correction

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: sewer venting problem

    that should read claw foot TUB...not toilet.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: sewer venting problem

    I have seen this before where someone had punctured a vent pipe when they were screwing a cabinet to the wall.

    From your description it is something that was done since your remodel. Curious what seal did you use for the height difference of the toilet?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: sewer venting problem

    after putting down your new tile it raises the toilet a little higher, did you use an extension that sits ontop of the old seat and raises the wax ring? your wax ring probally has flange on it that looks like a big funnel, so that would keep the water from pouring out onto the floor but would still alow the sewer gasses to escape. they make extension rings that you can buy at lowe's or most any supply house that sits below the wax ring and raises it up and makes a good seal.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: sewer venting problem

    A plastic collar (exetension ring)was screwed on top of the existing collar to make up the height difference from the tile & backerboard.

    If this were the only problem why would the tub drain be venting sewer gas only when it is used on days the wind is from the South? I keep suspecting the need to guard the vent on the roof. Either that or I have two separate problems. It's frustrating.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: sewer venting problem

    bryan I couldn't say for sure with out actually looking, though I have seen where air coming down the pipe actually caused the water in the trap to evaporate which allowed sewer gas to come up but even then that took a couple of days of the wind blowing and the tub not being used for it to do that because every time the tub is used it refills the trap. now that might be a thought you might check to see if the trap either has a hole in it, (some of the older cast pipes do spring leaks right in the bottom.) or it might be that the work might have made some joints loose

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1

    Default sewer venting problem -clawfoot tub

    I recently installed a clawfoot tub in my 1883 home and have noticed sewer gas. It is most certainly coming from the clawfoot tub overfill vent (inside the tube). I know this for certain because there are small black fly's that accompany this awful sewer gas and they come through the overflo vent.
    I dissembled the drain and vent assembly and noticed that the internal stopper (that rises or lowers to allow the tub to hold water) is like a small soupcan within the plumbing outlet piping. This small 'soupcap' does not have a top or bottom portion...just the round side and is attached via a linkage to the vent assembly.
    This works great for holding water inside the tub but does not prevent sewer gas from proceeding past it and coming into the bathroom via the bathtub overfill vent.
    My question is this. Should I have installed a S trap below the drain and vent assembly T ?
    Thank You,
    Matt

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8,068

    Default Re: sewer venting problem -clawfoot tub

    Quote Originally Posted by romanmatt View Post
    My question is this. Should I have installed a S trap below the drain and vent assembly T ?
    Uh, yup!

    All drains require a trap of some sort to prevent sewer gases from coming back out. Whether you see them or not, they're there. BTW, the stopper in the tub overflow is for stopping water from escaping the tub only, not preventing gas or anything else from coming back out. As a matter of fact, if it were a solid piece, then the overflow would not function because any water that entered couldn't get past the solid stopper, hence the through flow design.

    Hope the info helps.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: sewer venting problem

    To ****hiller:

    That exaplantion makes perfect sense. The crawl space is sealed off, outside of one VERY small entry hole on the N side, so your pressurization theory seems to explain the problem. The smell really did seem to come from several places when the South wind blew. Granted, we've not had much S wind recently here in KS but we have had some and I've not had even a hint of a scent since adding the extra ring -nor when then furnace is on.

    It's simple physics, I guess.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: sewer venting problem

    so my first post was right after all. looookie there

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