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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Question Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    Have a century home with a wood furnace in basement. Is there a way to protect and/or insulate the ceiling directly above furnace? I would like to keep the ceiling (and hardwood floor in living room above) from any further drying and shrinking. Would also like something to proect ceiling from chance of any sparks rising as I load furnace.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    612

    Default Re: Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    Is your basement finished or un-finished?

    The materials used would be different depending on what your basement looks like now. I think getting an small 1" or so airspace between layers in the ceiling would be an effective way to keep the upstairs floor from excessive heat.

  3. #3
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    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    hang 5/8 type x drywall above your woodstove, tape all joints this will give you protection against sparks and heat.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2007
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    Default Re: Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    Basement is unfinished.

    Would 5.8" type X need a metal heat shield?

  5. #5
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    Jun 2007
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    Fayette County, Ohio
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    Default Re: Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    A quick and easy fix would be to get a stove pad and nail it to the rafters with the metal side down.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  6. #6
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    I have a coal stove in our unfinished basement and in the immediate area above it I have insulation between the floor joists and then drywall.

    The bedroom right above the stove would get too warm that is the reason for the insulation. I did not do the entire ceiling because I wanted to heat the rest of the subfloor to warm the floors upstairs. It works very well, being barefoot in the winter is not at all uncomfortable. I also have hardwood floors throughout the house and don't have any excessive problems with shrinking. If you are having problems with the hardwood separating because the inside air is too dry during heating season, maybe a humidifier would help.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    The Great White North
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    Default Re: Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    Another suggestion would be to use cement backer board ... it's fireproof also won't have burn marks like the paper facing of drywall.

    If you wish to add a resistance from heat transfer you can attach metal U channel used for drywall .... these get attached to the joists and the backer board are attached to the channel. There will be an air gap between the backer board and the joist.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Pennsylvania
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    246

    Thumbs down Re: Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    Quote Originally Posted by DwarfWytch View Post
    There has been a lot of guessing and erroneous information and terms thrown throughout this thread.

    Combustibility Versus Fire-Rated Assemblies

    Fire safety properties of suspended ceilings are widely misunderstood, largely because there are several terms with similar but different meanings. Flame Spread, Class A, non-combustible, fire resistance rating, and fire-rated assembly all mean different things. Sorting out the differences can help.

    Non-combustible simply means that the material will not burn. Class A designation on products means that the material can be ignited, but will not sustain a flame, and the fire will extinguish itself. Flame spread is a measure of the material’s self-extinguishing characteristics. Both the characteristics of flame spread and smoke developed are measured in accordance with ASTM E-84, and the measurement will determine whether the material can be considered Class A.

    None of these terms should be mistaken or substituted for fire-rated assemblies or fire resistance ratings.

    Fire Resistance Rating and Fire-Rated Assemblies

    Fifteen to twenty percent of all suspended ceilings are sold and installed as fire-rated designs. “Fire resistance ratings” is the terminology that long has been used by Underwriters Laboratories to reference the performance of various constructions. The ratings relate to fire-tests designed to measure the time it takes for a fire to raise the temperature above the ceiling to unacceptable levels.

    The very phrase “fire-resistance” causes one to think immediately of the characteristics discussed earlier, i.e. non-combustible. This causes an unfortunate misconception that, if Class A materials are used in a suspended ceiling, it will stop a fire from spreading or that it is a “fire-rated” ceiling. That is not necessarily so.

    Fire rated ceilings (or fire-rated assemblies) are tested and certified in their entirety. This includes everything included in the construction. The entire design that was tested is identified in the UL Fire Resistance Directory, which is updated every year.

    Because the intense heat of a fire affects different materials in different ways, the materials need to be tested in context, or relative to one another. So a fire-rated ceiling assembly duplicates as closely as possible a small portion of the entire building including, but not limited to, concrete, bar joists, light fixtures, grid type, ceiling panel type, floor type, roof type, etc.

    The Underwriters Laboratories Fire Resistance Directory lists all of the types of constructions that have been tested in an actual fire environment. Although we are concerned primarily with ceilings in this case, the tests contained in the book also cover beams, columns, floors, roofs and wall constructions. It bears repeating, a fire rated assembly is the total construction as it was built and tested with all of the above. Any deviation from the construction tested leaves serious doubt as to the performance of the rest of the materials in the assembly.

    http://www.ul.com/architectural/faq.html


    http://database.ul.com/cgi-bin/XYV/t...gothernbr.html
    What is the purpose of this ?

    Stick to the topic. If you cannot give the OP a answer base on your own real live experiences then don't post anything.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    246

    Default Re: Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    Quote Originally Posted by DwarfWytch View Post
    The purpose was to answer the questions posed by the original post, and correct the disinformation that followed
    There are no disinformations here.

    You need to realize that the code varies from one state to another.

    Person living in California or Canada might’ve given correct advices but it doesn’t means it can be use in the state of NJ, Pa Fla, Texas, NC or others.

    Trust me on that. I've sold my house in Bucks County Pa and Burlington County NJ.
    They're within 60 miles of each other and the codes are different. Look at the map. Bucks County Pa and Burlington County NJ are located next to each other.

    You need to post real live experiences not based on what you "heard" or on internet hearsays.


    Be careful on what you preach. I've read couple disinformation by you and your other screen names.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    7

    Thumbs down Re: Protect ceiling above wood furnace

    BigWalt you're an ignorant phuck. Stick with stuffing your trailer's electrical boxes like sausages and burning yourself up in your trailer. Pity the fools whose cars you touch.

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