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Thread: Dead table saw?

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    What's the model number of your saw?
    Model # 113.298050. Thanks Jim.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnL View Post
    Model # 113.298050. Thanks Jim.
    Okay, your saw has an induction motor, and there are no brushes (or commutator). The likely culprit is the start capacitor. It's number 17 in the diagram, P/N STD376110, and the website shows it costing $7.49 plus shipping.

    The diagram should give a fairly good idea of how the motor housing comes apart, and once inside, you'll likely find that the capacitor just plugs in. You shouldn't even have to take the motor itself apart - just the end housing.

    You may find that the old capacitor was oil filled, and is leaking. That'll make the job a bit messy, but some naphtha, or mineral spirits will clean up the mess. Usual safety warnings regarding flammable solvents apply...

    It shouldn't be too bad a job at all
    Jim D.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Well, Jim, if you don't watch out, you're going to find yourself on my Christmas card list! It's very nice of you to check this out for me, and you're right, it doesn't sound too bad at all.
    By the way, when I turn the power on, there's no hum or any kind of sound at all. Does this sound right for a dead capacitor? And do you have any thoughts about the "click" that I heard just as it died? Circuit breaker in the saw?
    Thanks again.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnL View Post
    ...when I turn the power on, there's no hum or any kind of sound at all. Does this sound right for a dead capacitor? And do you have any thoughts about the "click" that I heard just as it died? Circuit breaker in the saw?
    Thanks again.
    You mentioned a hum, then a click, in an earlier message. It was probably a reset switch (circuit breaker) popping after the capacitor caused the current to go over its limit. There ought to be a re-set button somewhere in there - probably on the end bell of the motor. After replacing the capacitor, and re-setting the switch, everything ought to work again.

    Additional info - After looking again at the diagram and parts list, there's a start relay and a circuit protector in your saw as well as the capacitor. They're parts 14 and 16 in the diagram. The protector is the circuit breaker I mentioned, above. The relay, if its contacts are burnt or corroded, could also be the cause of your problem. All three parts (the capacitor, too) appear to be in the electrical box that's 'pig-tailed' to the motor. I doubt the circuit breaker is at fault. I might be the relay, but my bet is still for the capacitor, since they're the most common motor part to fail, and when they do will perform as you've described.
    Last edited by Jim DeLaney; 07-17-2007 at 09:45 PM.
    Jim D.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Okay, well, I don't know how long it takes to get parts from Sears, but I'll let you know what happens.
    Thanks again for all your help.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Okay, to continue the saga. It's taken some weird turns, for sure!
    In my original post, I said that when I pressed the reset button, nothing happened. It moved a little, that's all. Well, I replaced the capacitor, turned the switch on, and nothing! Not one sound. It just seemed a little weird to me that there would be NO sound at all, not even a hum. So I pressed the reset button again... nothing! So I held onto the saw with one hand and pressed the reset button with the other, for all I was worth. This time, it moved... a LOT! Clack! It was just like a circuit breaker in the house panel, and it took a lot of effort. So, my mistake, but in the end it really doesn't change anything. Because when I turned the saw on, it just hummed, just like with the original capacitor.
    Okay, here's the first weird thing: In order to take the front panel off to get to the capacitor, I had to tilt the arbor to 45 degrees. So I decided to put some oil on the shaft of the motor and let it run down into the motor. I had lightly oiled the shaft before, but always when the shaft was horizontal (blade at zero degrees). Without a manual, I never even knew if I was supposed to oil anything. I let it sit for a little while, and when I turned it on again, it ran! Over the course of about an hour, I turned that thing on and off several times, and it ran every time. Sounded perfect, looked perfect. Put the original capacitor back, it still ran every time. Let it run for several minutes, no problem. In the course of working on it, I had to have it upside-down several times, so I oiled the other end of the shaft also.
    Okay, so I felt real stupid! I put the saw back together, running it many times in the process, and it just ran like a champ. My wife was there, and she said, "man, it sounds better than it ever has!" So I've got everything all closed up and put together, and I put the blade on to check for alignment. Turned it on, and it just hummed! Barely moved at all! Blade back off again, turned it on, it just hummed and moved a little. Put the new capacitor in, it still just moved a little and hummed a lot.
    Here's weird thing number 2: In the course of trying this and trying that, I was turning it off and on several times. Every time, it just barely moved. But on 2 occasions, it moved backward! I'm hoping that will mean something to someone, but it sure doesn't mean anything to me.
    So, again, thanks for any advice.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnL View Post
    ...I was turning it off and on several times. Every time, it just barely moved. But on 2 occasions, it moved backward! I'm hoping that will mean something to someone, but it sure doesn't mean anything to me.
    So, again, thanks for any advice.
    Okay, it sounds like the start winding in the motor isn't 'kicking in.' Your induction motor has a centrifugal switch in it that works only on startup. Once the motor runs up to a certain RPM, the switch 'kicks out' and routes the power to the 'run' windings.

    It sounds like the switch has dirt and/or corrosion in it and is not making contact. You might get lucky and be able to blow the dirt out of it with compressed air - I never have, but maybe your luck is better than mine...

    Failing that, you'll have to disassemble the motor to access and clean the switch contacts. I doubt your manual will be any help at all for this, since Sears only wants to sell you a whole new motor, not parts.

    Good luck!
    Jim D.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    And this could make it run backwards?
    Thanks for the info.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnL View Post
    And this could make it run backwards?
    Thanks for the info.
    Potentially, yes... But it'd probably just turn VERY slowly - not run up to speed.

    To truly reverse an induction motor requires switching some wires in the motor's interior. Some motors - probably including the one in your saw - are not reversable.
    Jim D.

  10. #20
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    Jan 2008
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    I'm having the same problem. My saw is a contractor style with a start capacitor and a run capacitor. But both of the capacitors test to their rated capacitance.
    The motor runs fine when it's not attached to the blade pulley and belt. But when the belt is attached, it can't turn the blade.
    The blade and belt run free and easy when I turn them by hand.
    The saw is clean with no obstructions.
    The motor saw had been running fine. I made a couple of cuts one day, and turned the saw off to get the next piece ready. I made no changes to the saw, but when I turned it back on...nothing but the hummm and the click.
    Any ideas?

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