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Thread: Dead table saw?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Default Dead table saw?

    My Sears table saw was used when I inherited it 10 years ago, so I don't know how old it is. Today I was using it and once when I turned it on, instead of spinning up as usual, it hummed and turned very slowly for a few seconds then spun on up and worked fine. The next time I turned it on, though, it hummed and spun very slowly for about 15 seconds, then I heard a click (circuit breaker?) and it died.
    The reset button doesn't seem to be popped out, and pushing it doesn't do any good. I can spin the blade manually, and it certainly doesn't drag, but it doesn't seem to turn as freely as it used to.
    When I got the saw, there was no manual, and Sears doesn't have one available for viewing on their web site.
    So I have 2 questions:
    1) Does anyone have a guess as to the problem?
    2) Does anyone have a manual for a 10" model 113.298050 Sears table saw?

    Thanks a lot.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Austintown, Ohio
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    19

    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    The problem depends on the type of saw it is.

    If it's a 'contractor' saw - with the motor hanging out the back - it's most likely the start capacitor. That's the sort of can-looking thing that's on top of the motor. A motor repair shop can get you a replacement, for not too much money.

    If it's a direct-drive saw - with the motor connected directly to the blade - then it's most likely the motor brushes. Brushes will likely only be availavle through Sears. However, it the brushes are worn to the point of arcing to the motor's commutator, you may not be able to economically repair that motor. Brushes will only cost a few dollars, though, so they're worth a try.

    If you have a Sears model number for the saw - it oughta be on a label or tag somewhere near the front of the saw - you can go ****** and get a parts list from Sears website, or you can go to a Sears Parts/Repair store and they'll be able to look it up for you.

    COMMON SENSE HERE: Make sure the saw is unplugged before you attempt any parts removal or any other repair. SAFETY! Safety! Safety!
    Jim D.

  3. #3
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    Jun 2007
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    [QUOTE=Jim DeLaney;698]The problem depends on the type of saw it is.

    However, it the brushes are worn to the point of arcing to the motor's commutator, you may not be able to economically repair that motor. [/quote**

    Thanks, Jim. Will that be obvious, when the motor's taken apart?

  4. #4
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    Austintown, Ohio
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    [QUOTE=johnL;700]
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    The problem depends on the type of saw it is.

    However, it the brushes are worn to the point of arcing to the motor's commutator, you may not be able to economically repair that motor. [/quote**

    Thanks, Jim. Will that be obvious, when the motor's taken apart?
    I'm assuming, from your response, that it is a direct drive saw. If so, then yes, the arcing, burning, and probably deep grooving of the commutator will be evident.

    As for the brushes, depending on the saw, you might not need to disassemble the motor, or even remove it from the saw. Many Universal motors - which is the type that most direct drive saws have - have externally accessible brushes. Usually, they have external brush-holders that you can access just by removing a plastic or bakelite brush cap - one on either side of the motor.



    If yours is a contractor's type saw, with the externally mounted motor hanging off the back, it'll have neither brushes nor a commutator. It'll be an induction type motor with a starting capacitor mounted in a 'tin can' looking affair atop the motor.
    Jim D.

  5. #5
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    Jun 2007
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    [QUOTE=Jim DeLaney;701]
    Quote Originally Posted by johnL View Post

    I'm assuming, from your response, that it is a direct drive saw. If so, then yes, the arcing, burning, and probably deep grooving of the commutator will be evident.

    As for the brushes, depending on the saw, you might not need to disassemble the motor, or even remove it from the saw. Many Universal motors - which is the type that most direct drive saws have - have externally accessible brushes. Usually, they have external brush-holders that you can access just by removing a plastic or bakelite brush cap - one on either side of the motor.
    At this point, I'm assuming also that it's direct drive, since I haven't been able to even get to the motor at this point. But it is hidden inside the saw assembly, out of view. I remember now the type of brushes you're talking about; seen them a million times. If the motor has that type of brushes, will I be able to see the commutator? (Sorry to sound so ignorant, but since I haven't even seen the motor, it's hard to sound intelligent! I guess I'm going to have to buy a manual from Sears. I can't even figure out how to get inside there; the frame of the saw seems to be just a big welded-together box!)
    Thanks so much for your help!

  6. #6
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    Austintown, Ohio
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    [QUOTE=johnL;702...If the motor has that type of brushes, will I be able to see the commutator?...I can't even figure out how to get inside there; the frame of the saw seems to be just a big welded-together box!)
    Thanks so much for your help![/QUOTE]

    You'll probably only be able to see the portion of the commutator that's directly under the brushes, but you'll be able to see arcing or burn marks in that area by rotating the motor while looking down the brush channel. A flashlight will probably be handy, too.

    As for getting into the case, there's probably a removeable bottom on it, if you turn the saw upside-down.

    Also, if you go to the Sears Parts website, with your Model Number, there might be an exploded view of the saw there, which will give you a hint or two as to how it'll come apart.

    Good luck!
    Jim D.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    You'll probably only be able to see the portion of the commutator that's directly under the brushes, but you'll be able to see arcing or burn marks in that area by rotating the motor while looking down the brush channel.
    Okay, great! I can handle that.
    A flashlight will probably be handy, too.

    As for getting into the case, there's probably a removeable bottom on it, if you turn the saw upside-down.

    Also, if you go to the Sears Parts website, with your Model Number, there might be an exploded view of the saw there, which will give you a hint or two as to how it'll come apart.

    Good luck!
    I've seen that on the Sears website in the past, but yesterday, all I was able to find was a place to order things. maybe I should look harder!
    Thanks again for all the info. I appreciate it very much.

  8. #8
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    Location
    Chicago, IL
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Go here and enter your model number. There are exploded parts diagrams of your saw here.
    HTH

    Dave

  9. #9
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    Jun 2007
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Well, Dave, you're right. I found it, so thanks very much.

    Unfortunately... neither the parts list or diagram for the motor show any brushes. Where does this leave me? Anybody know?

  10. #10
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    Austintown, Ohio
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    Default Re: Dead table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnL View Post
    ... neither the parts list or diagram for the motor show any brushes. Where does this leave me? Anybody know?
    What's the model number of your saw?
    Jim D.

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