+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3

    Default iLevel Engineered Lumber

    Hi:

    I was interested in the use of the engineered lumber in a recent episode in Newton. The company website provides very detailed information for their use both as a beam and as a post. I'm not an engineer and those specifications are above me. Bottom line, I'm wondering if you used one of the engineered posts, say a 31/2"x51/2", and compared that to a comparable post made from standard lumber, which post would carry the largest load?

    Thanks,

    Dan
    Last edited by Dan008; 11-18-2007 at 07:33 AM. Reason: cosmetic

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Shamokin, Pa.
    Posts
    645

    Default Re: iLevel Engineered Lumber

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan008 View Post
    Hi:

    I was interested in the use of the engineered lumber in a recent episode in Newton. The company website provides very detailed information for their use both as a beam and as a post. I'm not an engineer and those specifications are above me. Bottom line, I'm wondering if you used one of the engineered posts, say a 31/2"x51/2", and compared that to a comparable post made from standard lumber, which post would carry the largest load?

    Thanks,

    Dan
    Usually the lumber yard where you order your material can provide that type of specs.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: iLevel Engineered Lumber

    Obviously, since it would be a post, I would be interested in the amount of weight or vertical load this engineered post could carry. I believe that the comparable 4x6 post that you get at a Home Depot, lets say, is yellow pine. Which is the better choice in terms of the larger load comparing a yellow pine post to this new engineered material?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: iLevel Engineered Lumber

    I have two suggestions:

    1. If you're new to these type of calculations I suggest you visit your local building official. They can give you all of the appropriate building code loads for your area.

    2. Work with your local lumber yard. Most larger lumber yards have people on staff that are trained in sizing those members.

    3. If that doesn't work then I really suggest you consult a local structural engineer.
    Todd Fratzel

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •