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  1. #1
    shank Guest

    Default subfloor

    my "old house" was built in 1873 and i'm looking to install a subfloor. the current floor is hardwood (which is unrepairable) and dips in spots and is very uneven. there is not a subfloor, the floor boards sit directly on the floor joists and so, i was wondering the best way to install a subfloor that is solid and level over the existing floor without ripping out the hardwood floors... (and i have a feeling shims won't be enough).. thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: subfloor

    Well, getting level without taking out the hardwood floor is going to be tough.

    Will it be a hardship if you lose 2.5" - 3" of headroom in the house? I am thinking that you may be able to lay and shim sleepers on top of the existing hardwood floors and nail the subfloor to the sleepers.

  3. #3
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: subfloor

    thank you for replying to my message, it was certainly appreciated. i guess i'm going to take your advice and shim sleepers underneath the subfloor, anything else would be opening a huge can of worms and seeing that i've already opened a "case" here, i'd rather not open anymore. thanks again!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: subfloor

    You will need to verify the existing joists are in good shape and strong enough to support the new floor.

    Good luck, have fun!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: subfloor

    IMO, it's impossible to answer your question reliably on a forum.
    We don't know the severity of the problem, nor the cause of it.

    The cause of your uneven floors could be floor joists that are too small for the span, joists that are too far apart, joist-ends that are no longer supported where and as high as they should be, structural problems such as deteriorated house sills, an intermediate basement or crawl-space supporting wall that's sinking, supporting piers which sinking, a supporting beam that's sagging, etc.

    The actual cause(s) needs to be determined before an effective and appropriate course of remedial action is undertaken. Taking a cosmetic approach when the problem is structural wouldn't be a wise expenditure of your time and money.

    (If it's determined that the structure is actually sound and the dips in the existing flooring are minor.........a floor leveling compound could be used directly over the existing HW floor)

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