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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    6

    Default replacing bathtub

    has anyone got info on removing old ceramic tub? the discussion of an insert or resurfacing isnt what my mother wants to do.

    she wants a new tub, can it be removed without smashing with a sledge hammer?

    plumbing can be reached from basement.

    need to know whether this is totally impossible for an average skilled person

    thanks

    bje

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: replacing bathtub

    I wanted to have some professional guidance on a nearly identical situation. I want to remove a tub and convert the same space into a shower, but the narrow bathroom is the same width as the tub, and with mudset tile wainscott, I can't think of any way to remove that tub without busting it apart with a sledgehammer ( recomended by a plumber ). the two end walls are an exterior brick wall, and the other has the diverter and leads into a closet. the wall behind is another tub/hall bath. Is it ok to bash it with asledge hammer, and might it help to take a grinder and sort of saw a line thru the porcelain hoping it'll braek there? what do the pros do?
    Mike

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: replacing bathtub

    I remove tubs all the time. If it's cast iron you will need to use the sledge. If it's a steel tub you can cut it in in half and remove it that way. To convert to a shower you will need to change the drain pipe diameter to a 2" pipe. You might have to move it some too. To put in a new tub will require removing parts of the end walls to allow access to install the new tub and fasten it to the studs. I would really recomend a tub liner. It will be cheaper and faster than having it done the conventional way. Take a look at: http://www.bathfitter.com
    Before you make a decision. They have some really nice products.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: replacing bathtub

    I would like to do the same as mlwhitten - remove tub & replace with shower. How do I know if I have a steel or a cast-iron tub? (Forgive my ignorance.)
    Thanks,
    SSP

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: replacing bathtub

    Quote Originally Posted by parkers View Post
    I would like to do the same as mlwhitten - remove tub & replace with shower. How do I know if I have a steel or a cast-iron tub? (Forgive my ignorance.)
    Thanks,
    SSP
    Knock on it as if you were knocking on someone's front door. A steel tub will have a hollow sort of ring to it, where a cast tub will have a solid thud. You'll also notice a difference in how it feels when you knock, the steel almost feel soft while the cast will feel like a rock.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: replacing bathtub

    If you have to break up the old bathtub to get it out, how will you get the new one in? If you currently have a cast iron tub, are you going to replace it with another cast iron tub? A steel or plastic tub won't measure up once you have gotten used to cast iron.

    Removing a plastic or steel tub to upgrade to cast iron would make since, but you need to be able to get it into place, they are very heavy. If you have a plastic or steel tub, I can agree with your mother, but if its cast iron and getting a new one in place will be very difficult, resurfacing would be a viable option. Also if the current one is steel or plastic and you can't get a 500 pound cast iron tub into place, consider an Americast tub. They feel almost as good, in the store anyway.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32

    Default Re: replacing bathtub

    I guess I have a similar situation. How do I remove a large bathtub without destroying it? The tub is a couple of years old and probably in excellent condition. I think it is made of steel.

    To give a little further background, a recent energy audit revealed that the contractor we hired to put on an addition may have failed to insulate the along the exterior walls adjacent to the tub. I am thinking that if there is an easy way to get the tub out temporarily, it should be easy to install some rigid insulation.

    I guess my secondary question is: What is the proper technique to insulate an area like this?

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