+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    4

    Default Lead paint test failure

    We hit a huge stumbling block that shut down the whole project. Listen if you will and lend some support or advice if you can.
    We bought and old house built in 1907. Old disgusting carpet gives me miserable allergies so we tore it all out. We found Douglas fir and soft pine floors that we were going to sand and refinish. The old wood floors have the typical old thick paint around the perimeter of the room. I read so many stories about people sanding it or stripping it. I was about to rent the sander and then it hit me. “What if this is lead paint?” I went to home depot and bought Klean strip D led paint test kit. I followed the directions and got a negative test result for one of the rooms. They all have paint. The directions said to test the activity of solution 2 if a negative result was obtained. I put a drop of solution 2 on the indicator strip provided with the kit and did not observe a color change. According to the directions this means the solution number 2 is inactive. It turns out the test is expired. What? Why are they selling expired test for something as ominous as led paint? I went to the home depot website and read the customer reviews for this product and several more people are complaining that their test kit was expired. So I will return the test and test again tomorrow. My burning question is, “What if it is led paint? We have three kids including a baby and the floors are bare with the possibility of lead paint on the floors that we wanted to sand and refinish. We don’t have the money to get it professionally removed. What might someone do in this situation? We are not moved in yet but are waiting on this issue to be resolved. Any ideas?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,791

    Default Re: Lead paint test failure

    Those tests were always unreliable to begin with. They may not even be in production anymore. You have to scra_pe up some chips and send them to a lab. Cost is about $100.

    If you remove the paint using a wet stripper and scra_per, there should not be a problem with lead except for the disposal. It would be hazardous waste so you can't just put it into the garbage. It is a health problem for you if you dry sand it and create airborne dust.

    BTW, without the underscore in scra_pe, this web site rejects the word.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Lead paint test failure

    Thank you. I bought a test kit by 3M this time and it indicated led paint. I bought coveralls, lead dust respirtor, 6 mil plastic for sealing the doors and vents; the whole nine yards. I'm going to try to strip it. This paint is over 100 years old probably. I cant live with carpet, you should have the shovel fulls of dust that came out of the old carpet. Now I have to deal with lead but I will update the results of stripping for anyone searching this forum.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,762

    Default Re: Lead paint test failure

    Good luck to you and be careful.

    Carpets are so 20th century. Stains, dust, allergies, smell - are some of the reasons why.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Lead paint test failure

    Ok, most of the paint came up. I used citristrip and a joint compound type knife. The paint came up a a thick, rubbery, putty type of scum. There is still a lot of paint still on the floor though. Some of the areas have a thin residue of paint on them that is too thin to sc_r_ape. Does anyone have any ideas about how to get this thin residue up?
    thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,203

    Default Re: Lead paint test failure

    Since you're not moved in yet, the issue of created dust may not be as big an issue as it would later be. If it were me at this point I would pack up the plastic and stripping materials and call in the floor sanders to see what they will do. They may want to do a lead test or they may 'overlook' that and sand away. If the latter it's their risk, not yours. Just be sure that you specify a thorough vacuuming on completion of sanding and total debris removal by them. Maybe not the best approach morally but it's certainly the most practical one for you.

    Phil

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,791

    Default Re: Lead paint test failure

    Heres a thought, keep using the stripper until the only paint left is the paint that is imbedded in the wood. Then consider painting the wood floors. Painted wood floors would be period correct and are making a comeback. You can even paint them in patterns like a checkerboard. This really is best if the wood used in your floors is not a high quality wood, like a simple pine for example. Then you can cover the paint with a urethane clear coat to protect it.

    Once coated, the lead in the remaining paint embedded in the wood grain is considered incapsulated so it is not a hazard to you or any occupants.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •