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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Default Quiet Heating Options for Garage studio?

    Hi,

    I'm converting my std. 2 car garage into a recording studio. It's Seattle, so it's not totally freezing, but I will need a bit of heating. I was looking for suggestions that will be, above all QUIET.

    I'll be building a 16x20' inner room to isolate the recording room from the garage and the natural gas furnace will be just outside so there is easy access to a gas line.

    How tough would it be to install one of those radiant heaters I've seen on shop floors?

    Would that fit my needs?

    TIA,

    ---JC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    6,480

    Default Re: Quiet Heating Options for Garage studio?

    I just did a similar conversion and installed a P-Tec unit. A P-Tec is the same type of heat/ac unit that you'll find at most hotels these days. The unit I put in was extremely quiet. I don't recall the size of the unit installed, probably between 1/2 and 1 ton, our finished room was 17x18. I can tell you we oversized the unit a bit because there was no insulation in the walls or ceiling.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    58

    Default Re: Quiet Heating Options for Garage studio?

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    I just did a similar conversion and installed a P-Tec unit. A P-Tec is the same type of heat/ac unit that you'll find at most hotels these days. The unit I put in was extremely quiet. I don't recall the size of the unit installed, probably between 1/2 and 1 ton, our finished room was 17x18. I can tell you we oversized the unit a bit because there was no insulation in the walls or ceiling.
    Thanks. How much do they cost? Can you recommend a brand? What is involved with installation? I'm good with carpentry and electrical, but don't know much about HVAC or plumbing. Can you give me some thoughts on installation?

    THANKS!

    ---JC

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: Quiet Heating Options for Garage studio?

    The P-Tec is an Amana unit. My HVAC guy sized the unit and wanted $1600 for it. My client found the same exact thing ****** for a little over $700 delivered. This is a self contained, 220v unit that is mounted through the wall. Other than being on a dedicated circuit, I can't give you specifics on the electrical, the electrician took care of that.

    Installation was pretty straight forward, just use care in your layout so that you don't over cut the hole and have huge, jagged, ugly gaps around it. Once you've got it cut and headed out, you just slip the wall sleeve into place and screw it in, then the unit slides inside the sleeve. It comes with well written instructions, so it's all pretty easy.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    693

    Default Re: Quiet Heating Options for Garage studio?

    I think Sprucy meant a PTAC heater/ac unit. Great, but you did not mention wanting ac. There will also be some fan noise when it is running.

    Gas radiant heat would be the schnitz as far as quiet but wonder if you have considered electric baseboard heating. BB would be cheap to buy and quiet.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    550

    Default Re: Quiet Heating Options for Garage studio?

    suntower:

    The other posters offer excellent ideas.

    I'm certainly no expert on studio layout for recording rooms--my experience is that it is so dedicated a topic that it is best to consult with those who have gone thru the trial & error stages & have come up with the best solutions for the least amount of $$$.

    There are many interesting forums on the internet dedicated solely to home and garage recording studio design and layout.

    Your idea of "building a room within a room" is a large step in the right direction.

    If you do a lot of research on the internet & use the "back & forth" forums devoted to home studios, talk to studio engineers/owners, you will come up with a studio layout that will get it right the first time for the least amount of $$$.

    Many music equipment stores (and Barnes & Noble) have dedicated books on the topic.

    Required readings:

    Google "Acoustic treatment for Home Studios","Planning for Noise, Heat and Power","Garage...how to kill the sound","Studio layout:removing audio noise", "recording studio layout ideas hvac", "Home recording studio HVAC", "Home Recording Studio: Build it like the Pros"

    You can also do a Google using the basic phrase "studio layout" combined with words like "garage", "recording studio", "heat", etc.

    When you say you have a "gas furnace" just outside, do you mean a forced hot air furnace, a forced hot water boiler, or what??

    All heating/cooling units are sized according to the amount of BTUs needed to heat or cool the studio---a very basic calculation is to take the square footage of the studio, assign approx 30-40 btu/foot to come up with a rough number for the size of the heating unit.

    Thus 20' X 16' = 320 sq.ft. X 40 = 12,800 btu/hr approx. needed to heat the studio--Google "heat loss calculation" to get a more accurate formula/program to size your heat/ac equipment.


    http://acapella.harmony-central.com/...php?p=37485167
    http://www.instructables.com/id/SSF25LDFRIQQMG1
    Last edited by NashuaTech; 11-21-2009 at 12:04 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Quiet Heating Options for Garage studio?

    Thanks. I was hoping to get some feedback on infrared/naturalgas units as well. Electric heat is quite expensive here.

    Cheers,

    ---JC

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    The P-Tec is an Amana unit. My HVAC guy sized the unit and wanted $1600 for it. My client found the same exact thing ****** for a little over $700 delivered. This is a self contained, 220v unit that is mounted through the wall. Other than being on a dedicated circuit, I can't give you specifics on the electrical, the electrician took care of that.

    Installation was pretty straight forward, just use care in your layout so that you don't over cut the hole and have huge, jagged, ugly gaps around it. Once you've got it cut and headed out, you just slip the wall sleeve into place and screw it in, then the unit slides inside the sleeve. It comes with well written instructions, so it's all pretty easy.

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