+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1

    Default Repair shower grout myself or hire expert?

    The grout in our shower seems to have a few gaps, so I think it needs to be replaced. It is about 18 years old. The grout is quite narrow, 1/8 " or so. I am pretty handy, but I don't want to damage a lot of the tiles while trying to save a few bucks with my labor.

    Is replacing the grout a homeowner job or best left to the professionals? If I do it myself, is it better to remove all the old grout or only repair areas that seem damaged?
    Thanks for any input!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,557

    Default Re: Repair shower grout myself or hire expert?

    It is DIY possible. I would sugest you look at FEIN MULTITOOL go to the bottom of the page and click on video. It will explain it a lot better than I can.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Repair shower grout myself or hire expert?

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    It is DIY possible. I would sugest you look at FEIN MULTITOOL go to the bottom of the page and click on video. It will explain it a lot better than I can.
    Jack
    YOu took the words right outta my mouth Jack...cept' I'm doubtin' a HO is gonna spring a cpl a hundred+ bucks for the MM unless they have other uses for it. I've seen some good deals on the older model. You've seen the new and improved model that came out about a month or so ago haven't you?
    Hey....I have an idea...she can buy the new model and when she's done I'll buy it from........hmmmmmmm...nah...by then she'll prolly' wanna buy all kinda new attachments for it as well as the Fein vac to hook it up to
    Hidden Content
    ॐשָׁלו

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,557

    Default Re: Repair shower grout myself or hire expert?

    andybuildz
    I've been looking at the complete kit and am on the verge of placing an order. Buy the way you should type Home Owner rather than HO it could be misunderstood.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Repair shower grout myself or hire expert?

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    andybuildz
    I've been looking at the complete kit and am on the verge of placing an order. Buy the way you should type Home Owner rather than HO it could be misunderstood.
    Jack
    LOL...lucky I didn't use the word nappy LOLOL.
    Check Ebay..This guys been selling the new model I believe brand new cheaper than anyone on the net as far as I can tell for quite a while now.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Fein-FMM250-Mult...QQcmdZViewItem
    Hidden Content
    ॐשָׁלו

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Repair shower grout myself or hire expert?

    While everyone else is yukking it up, I'll say yes, it's something a Home Owner who is handy can DIY.

    Choose some slender tool, preferably with some sort of hook at its tip, and pick away at anything loose. When nothing loose remains, clean the joints as well as practicable. hat the guys are referring to is a power tool to remove all the grout, which would be ideal but not absolutely necessary. There are small hand tools called grout sc****rs that you can use. The best tool is the one you actually have available (already on hand or at the store). But you don't absolutely need to remove grout in good solid condition, if any. Your call.

    First a question: Are there lots of gaps with more loose grout ready to fall out? Because if you just have a little gap here and a pinhole or two there, simply plug them with some waterproof caulk, preferably 100% silicone, available in smaller tubes for small jobs like this, as well as 10 oz. cartridges.

    But if the grout seems to be breaking up -- and this is NOT a normal condition even after 18 years -- then you do need to regrout. If you regrout only partially, you may -- probably will -- end up with two shades when finished, which is why a total regrout is advisable over partial.

    Use a latex additive and a "wall grout" float -- smooth rubber. Fill the joints by pressing the mix down into them as you work, it must go deep. Leave the joints a little overfull, but try to get as much as possible off the faces of the tile. Then after it firms up, use a damp sponge to [gently at first] rub each joint lengthwise to smooth the grout down to where it looks like it should. As it gets harder the first hour you'll simply work harder but the results will be better; you have a few days to finish but it keeps getting harder until after about a week when it have achieved the initial seven-day set, after which you are DONE, period, so try to finish much sooner. This is more work than most guys are wiklling to do, they just wipe it to where they want it while still soft. But this method will give you very smooth joints that are as even as you care to make them, and will dry more quickly and completely to help preclude mold/mildew growth.

    Do NOT grout the corner joint between any two planes (walls). Instead, use the matching 100% silicone caulk mentioned above, after everything is dry and you have polished the faces of the tiles vigorously with anything terrycloth -- I use cheap white washcloths from Wal-Mart, but you probably have some ragged old stuff saved just for jobs like this.

    Advice: When using 100% silicone, keep one paper towel in one hand to wipe off the dry fingertip (of the other hand) you use to smooth the SMALL bead of caulk you lay into the corner; another handy to replace that one as needed; another under the tip of the cartridge (a tube may not need this); and the roll with easy reach. Don't go back over any silicone after even just a few minutes; smooth one corner at a time, wiping the finger as need depending how much extra you used, then the entire length in one stroke; and three-joint corners wiping from one right around to another, trying not to mess the third. If you later see something that needs to be redone, wait a day, don't touch any that isn't fresh out of the tip or you'll drag it into a ragged smear. Even a few minutes is too long. Remove any smears on the glaze by rubbing immediately with a clean paper towel. There is absolutely NO solvent available to clean up cured 100% silicone, so work fastidiously neatly!

    If it turns out you do need to regrout completely, this is enough of a grueling job that you might want to think about whether you would like to retile altogether. Like new paint, there's nothing like new tile, and the selection now compared to 18 years ago is wonderful.

    There is another thread about tiling over existing tile near here, but for wall tile in a shower stall or tub surround, I'd advise total demo and a fresh start with new substrate material, over a vapor barrier over insulation, etc.

    Consider also the condition of the tub (if not a stall shower), because that is the time (bare studs) to replace it if needed.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •