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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6

    Question What nightmares could all these mirrors present if taken off?

    This is the small bathroom in the home we are purchasing. We want to take the mirrors down before we do our main move in. The first pic shows the mirror above and to the side of the sink. The other picture (yes in in the shower/bath area. The whole thing has mirrors. This is my main concern is the mirrors in the tub area. How is the best way to get them down. It seems that there are clips along the edges but can't tell if they are glued, caulked or cemented on some way. Any suggestions. I do NOT want to be in the middle of this job and get stuck thinking I should have left them on because it may be such a nightmare. I would LOVE any suggestions.
    Maybe I'll be lucky and it will be easy. I just want to know what issues MAY come up so I am prepared. Thanks.
    These were taken during the walkthrough. So it is NOT me that didn't clean them..lol
    Thanks
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,241

    Default Re: What nightmares could all these mirrors present if taken off?

    If you're lucky, they are held on by the clips only. If you're unlucky, mirror mastic was also used which is pretty tough to break loose without breaking the mirrors. Breaking the mirrors isn't that big a deal, unless you have a fear of bad luck , catoptrophobia , or a fear of sharding glass . The former I can't help with, the latter is easily contained with a tarp, old blanket, or even a piece of plywood.

    If you choose to go forward and have to break the mirrors, make sure you're wearing safety glasses, wearing gloves, and long sleeves. Have a few boxes handy to place the broken glass into and dispose of it, makes it easier not having to handle it multiple times or risk scattering it as it goes to the garbage can or garbage truck.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    126

    Default Re: What nightmares could all these mirrors present if taken off?

    I have a similar situation in our dining room. We have plaster walls with a "raised" plaster frame around the wall, and insed the frame is 3 large mirrors, there are no clips so I think it's glued somehow. I'm afraid I'm going to have huge chunks of plaster falling off the wall when I finally get the courage to tear it off. (If their are three mirrors that are butt up against eachother to essentially form "one" large mirror, that only counts as 7 years bad luck and not 21, right???)
    Proud to be suburban free.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,241

    Default Re: What nightmares could all these mirrors present if taken off?

    Quote Originally Posted by KCPumpkinStalker View Post
    (If their are three mirrors that are butt up against eachother to essentially form "one" large mirror, that only counts as 7 years bad luck and not 21, right???)
    You wish!

    I've had to remove mirrors like that before as well, though mine were over drywall. Sometimes you're able to get them off in one piece, sometimes they come off in many pieces. If the L&P is sound, then you shouldn't have any problems with damage when the mirrors are removed. If the L&P is weak or damaged, then you'll likely pull some chunks off with the mirrors unless you smash the mirrors then sc**** the individual glue spots. I always try to remove the mirrors in one piece, just so that there's no shards or mess to clean up. I still lay plywood and tarps on the floor for protection and a d**** around the area to contain any unruly shards should the mirror break during removal. For the stubborn ones, a thin piece a plywood against the mirror, then smack it with a hammer in multiple places to shatter the glass, yet contain everything into a neat pile on the floor directly below. As always, make sure you've got safety glasses, gloves, and protective clothing on.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    109

    Default Re: What nightmares could all these mirrors present if taken off?

    Hiring this out to experienced glass & window installers is the easiest, cheapest usually, and safest, and I strongly recommend you consider this (as it also assures safe disposal). If determined to DIY it, here are some tricks of the trade:

    Use vacuum/suction cup glass handlers. Before removing/loosening the set screws in the retention clips first score between wall and the back edge of the mirrors where possible to do so (blade flat against wall not into the wall surface. Most often previous painting and wall papering projects allow some paint/glue to drip behind mirror. With a shop vacuum nozle in hand use a stiff brush to clean out any collections of dust/glue/muck that has collected (can be almost cement like in bathroom from years of moistening and drying).

    Get a long length wire/string saw and a glass cutting tool. Often easier to remove section by section. Use wire saw to work behind mirror and cut through mastic dabs which are likely now quite hard and brittle. Then use even pressure to remove glass (after removing set screws from retaining clips). Keep a razor knife handy to cut any tear out from facing paper of wall board to avoid larger damage.

    A two-man pro team could have this out and disposed of and cleanup in less than an hour working with large areas of old mirror glass in confined space is very dangerous for inexperienced, a sharp piece of non-tempered glass can slice a major blood vessle like a hot knife through butter. By the time you amass the tools and start the project you could have already had it done by a professional window and glass company with no risk to yourself and started the wall repair and refinishing.

    Line tub/shower and fixtures with protective padding and canvas tarp to avoid damages to finish and should the glass fall.

    Long length thick suede "fireplace" gloves work well. Be sure to protect neck and face in addition to eyes. PPE in such tight quarters and from the tub area would include chaps/body armor.
    Last edited by Gray Watson; 11-05-2009 at 11:25 AM.
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