+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    8

    Exclamation Water in Garage?

    I need help. My garage has a drainage problem. Each time it snows or rains and we park in the garge all the water from our vehicles drips off the cars and runs towards the house. Some water is actually seaping underneath the walls and into the house. We are afraid that mold and other types of problems could exist. What do we do?? Help please?? Do we need to do something to the garage floor???
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4827.jpg 
Views:	178 
Size:	17.1 KB 
ID:	2912   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4828.jpg 
Views:	162 
Size:	14.9 KB 
ID:	2913   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4826.jpg 
Views:	168 
Size:	13.9 KB 
ID:	2914  
    Last edited by rushmore_00; 11-01-2009 at 11:51 PM. Reason: add additional picture

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Casper, Wyoming
    Posts
    159

    Default Re: Water in Garage?

    The water seeping into your home isn't a garage problem, its a waterproofing problem in your house. Do you also get water into your home when it rains? Water should not be seeping into your home. Get some waterproofing estimates and find the best way to prevent these problems in your home. YOu may need a new concrete garage floor.
    ___________
    Networx.com
    We provide the latest information on how to fix, renovate, and decorate your house using the least amount of resources for the best value.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Water in Garage?

    It is a garage problem. No water comes into the house from rain. Due to the massive amount of snow we receive in the Black Hills, our vehicles melt a huge amount of water onto the garage floor. The water from the melting snow has no where to run. It runs straight towards our house and seeps underneath the sill plates on the garage floor. This is why water has damaged much of the sheetrock and walls. I need to figure out a way to keep water away from the walls and divert it someplace.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,081

    Default Re: Water in Garage?

    Park outside ...

    The garage floor is probably sloped about like it should, from the back to front (towards driveway ). From the pictures I see that the house wall is next to the garage door. The way this SHOULD have been done is a curb would have been poured so that the house was either isolated OR 4" above the garage floor. Technically speaking, the house should be at least 4" above the garage floor so that gas fumes stay in the garage and don't seep into the house. But to talk about that now is like closing the barn door after the horse has run away.

    I would strip the drywall off the garage side of the wall up high enough to at least remove the damage 6" may do it. Snap a chalk line or draw a line along the length of the wall and remove just that portion of drywall. Inspect the sill plate and framing to make sure no further damage is present. If there is damage, replace it with new materials, pressure treated for the sill, regular lumber for the studs. Scrub and wash the sill plate and concrete slab to remove any dirt and debris and allow to fully dry.* Apply a heavy bead of sealant along the floor/sill joint and lay off with your finger or other tool.**

    * - You may need to wait until spring/summer when the weather is warm and dry and no further water/snow is being brought into the garage. It is important that the surfaces be clean and fully dry for the caulk to adhere and seal.

    ** - Read the label for clean up of the caulk. You will want to have latex gloves on OR use a disposable tool. Laying off the caulk does two things, it forces it into the joint and it finishes the surface to a nice appearance.

    As for what type of caulk to use, it should be an elastomeric type, not silicone or latex. Read the labels, what you want is something designed for concrete that is pliable through the temperature range of the job. I don't have a recommendation because I don't use it very often and labels/brands change.

    Replace the damaged drywall with the same thickness - should be 5/8" which is code. Paper or mesh tape is acceptable with at least one coat of drywall compound over the fasteners and joints.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    8

    Red face Re: Water in Garage?

    You are right, it is sloped, but it sure doesnt go towards the driveway. It seems like it slopes directly to the house. Would you recommend I place some 8" concrete blocks on the garage floor in front of the sill to keep the new sheetrock from receiving future water damage. Any ideas on how to affix the concrete blocks to the floor. Silicone or concrete?? Which would work best?? I really wish I could install some sort of drain or at least a groove to direct the water to the outdoors?

    I would probably have to rent a jack hammer for that job???

    Just looking for a simple, satisfactory solution. Less time, less money.....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Water in Garage?

    Yep -- as Sprucey mentioned the pad should be lower creating a barrier between the house and the pad.

    Short of tearing things out you might need to cut a drain trough for the water to flow out the garage door. If the pad itself doesn't slope out then the trough waould need to be cut so to create a slope for the water to run. You would start it shallower at the beginning and deeper as you approach and beyond the door.
    Or --- perhaps cut a strip out of the pad the entire length --- dig the gravel to provide a slope --- install drain pipe to direct the water out.

    I don't believe blocks are the way to go --- they will intially provide a damn but will eventually become saturated and if too close to the home's structure will cause the same issue you currently have.

    2 cents.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •