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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default balcony over porch - rotting wood

    I live in an 85 year old brick end of row. The back porch is on a concrete slab and has a covered balcony above. The balcony and porch both have wooden support posts. I recently took on the task of stripping the paint on the balconly floor (tongue & groove wood) so it could be repainted. I quickly discovered that some of the floor boards were rotting. That led me to discover that some of the post supports are also rotting along with the fascia beam (?). Upon further investigation I learned that a previous owner attempted to do some repairs to the balcony by added some pressure treated wood but it doesn't appear that the repair is structurally adequate. This evening I decided to poke around at the porch ceiling (also tongue & groove wood) only to discover more wood rot. The wood rot seems to be localized to just the perimiter. I've jacked up the balcony roof in attempts to replace the post supports with new wood but I'm not sure what to do about the fascia beam and the balcony floor joists or the porch ceiling? I would like to either tear out the porch ceiling and replace with vinyl or cover over the porch ceiling with new vinyl if possible thus eliminating one more area of required painting.

    Suggestions needed for the other rotting wood repairs.

    Here is a picture of the balcony and porch



    Here is a pic of the porch ceiling with the rotting wood



    Thanks for any advice you can share!

    Dean

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Derry, NH
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: balcony over porch - rotting wood

    Looks serious.

    I'd brace all the way to the next level and start excavating all rot as far as it went a structurally repair all bad parts even if it meant replacing the entire deck and roofing material to get at things right.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    598

    Default Re: balcony over porch - rotting wood

    Take the ceiling down to get a better look at whats going on inside. It has to come down anyway..Looks like the water that soaked through the deck above was trapping all the water inside the floor joist cavity........

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    367

    Default Re: balcony over porch - rotting wood

    I have the same situation and what I did was take out all the flooring from the porch above, so I could see the insides of the structure. We had some rot on the floor joists but not a complete disaster so I scabbed some 2x6s onto the sides of the existing joists. They were OK where they joined the perimeter of the structure. Once we had that done, I cut some long wedges out of the 2x material and nailed it to the top of the joists to give it a 1/2" slope to keep the water running away from the house.

    Once that was done and all the rotted wood was repaired, we laid the sub floor and covered it with a silicon based sealer and let it set up. I've seen sheet rubber used on roofs like yours and if you use it, lap it over the perimeter structure to seal that crack. Now you should be able to re-lay your floor. Nailing through the rubber will make penetrations but you could talk to a roofer and get some good advice there too.

    Good Luck.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: balcony over porch - rotting wood

    Quote Originally Posted by deantaco99 View Post
    I live in an 85 year old brick end of row. The back porch is on a concrete slab and has a covered balcony above. The balcony and porch both have wooden support posts. I recently took on the task of stripping the paint on the balconly floor (tongue & groove wood) so it could be repainted. I quickly discovered that some of the floor boards were rotting. That led me to discover that some of the post supports are also rotting along with the fascia beam (?). Upon further investigation I learned that a previous owner attempted to do some repairs to the balcony by added some pressure treated wood but it doesn't appear that the repair is structurally adequate. This evening I decided to poke around at the porch ceiling (also tongue & groove wood) only to discover more wood rot. The wood rot seems to be localized to just the perimiter. I've jacked up the balcony roof in attempts to replace the post supports with new wood but I'm not sure what to do about the fascia beam and the balcony floor joists or the porch ceiling? I would like to either tear out the porch ceiling and replace with vinyl or cover over the porch ceiling with new vinyl if possible thus eliminating one more area of required painting.

    Suggestions needed for the other rotting wood repairs.

    Here is a picture of the balcony and porch



    Here is a pic of the porch ceiling with the rotting wood



    Thanks for any advice you can share!

    Dean
    Dean
    I have a wrap around covered porch that is 10 years old. I am in the process of repairing the areas that have rotted primarily the bottom area of wooden columns and white cedar wood railings. My fir tongue and groove ceiling are in fine shape due to a roof with no leaks and my decking is in great shape because I used tongue and groove mahogany screwed to the rafters with stainless steel screws, Mahogany was was the preferred material at the time.( today I would use IPE decking which is available in a quality that looks identical to Mahogany or teak and requires less maintenance) I do have an area that has a uncovered balcony above where the Tongue and mahogany was used as decking screwed with stainless steel screws to sleepers over a rubber membrane that is sealed to exterior grade plywood. The sleepers allow for air to circulate under the decking. This also has held up well.
    Several wooden columns rotted at the bottom because they were directly exposed to the elements along with wooden white cedar railings. I live in home that is approximately 1,000 ft from Long Island sound and the salt air. I have learned through trial and error and found that using cement to support the base of the columns covered in fiberglass matting and fiberglass resin provides a combination of the mass and strength you need to fill the rotted area and to be resistant to water damage.
    I replaced all the rotted white cedar used for railings and used fiberglass matting and resin to join the railing to the columns to seal that area from without accumulating water and eventual rotting
    Regards
    Bill

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