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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    693

    Default Re: camper to house?

    Quote Originally Posted by college student View Post
    A 50amp RV (cord) has 2 hots, 1 neutral, and 1 ground. There normally are no 2-pole breakers in an RV panel because everything runs on 120V.

    I hope that clarifies the verbosity.
    It may in some situations be true that 50amp services are single pole and even double pole and 120v but there are many that run 240v appliances at 50amps off of two legs of single phase…………

    By the way college student………… You may want to spell “separate” correctly………

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: camper to house?

    I understand that 240V appliances can operate with 50amps from both legs of a single phase, but most recreational vehicles do not have anything 240V. My original point.

    And sorry for the misspelling of 'separate', sometimes I type too fast.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Shamokin, Pa.
    Posts
    645

    Default Re: camper to house?

    Quote Originally Posted by college student View Post
    I understand that 240V appliances can operate with 50amps from both legs of a single phase, but most recreational vehicles do not have anything 240V. My original point.

    And sorry for the misspelling of 'separate', sometimes I type too fast.
    I am still confused about those 240 volts you speak of. Where exactly are they coming from? If from a load center, than it would be two legs of 120 volts, correct?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    West Jordan, Utah
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: camper to house?

    Most RVs that are wired for 50 amps use each hot leg separately as two 120 volt circuits.
    Slow The Flow

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: camper to house?

    Quote Originally Posted by Blake View Post
    Most RVs that are wired for 50 amps use each hot leg separately as two 120 volt circuits.
    I concur. Thank you.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Shamokin, Pa.
    Posts
    645

    Default Re: camper to house?

    Quote Originally Posted by college student View Post
    I concur. Thank you.
    Now we are on the same page. Thanks !!!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: camper to house?

    I have been reading a book about home wiring and was wondering about 220 volt circuits. Do they not have a neutral? This book is very good showing 110 circuits, but not very clear on 220. I understand the 110 pretty well but I'm a little confused about how the circuit works with no neutral? Also it says that the grounds and neutrals should be on separate bus bars in the service panel, but in mine the grounds and neutrals are all on the same bar. Also, if i understand correctly a 110 circuit would use a single pole breaker and a 220 would use a double correct?? Thanks again for the advice and "education".

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,558

    Default Re: camper to house?


    You take a transformer (A) wired so that the secondary windings output 240 volts, you add a wire connected to the middle of the windings (called center tap) Now you have a trans former that out puts 240 volts between the top and bottom leg and 120 volts between the center tap and either of the other two legs.

    In residential wiring the center tap is referenced (by a physical connection) to ground. This grounded line is called the neutral line because it has a neutral voltage potential when compared to ground but it is a current carrying conductor.

    In the main panel the ground bus and neutral bus are tied together either as a single bus or through a connection of both busses through the panel, On sub panels the bonding screw is removed and the neutral and ground are separate.

    A 120 volt circuit only needs a single breaker because it only has one leg that is not referenced to ground. The 240 volt circuit uses 2 lines not reference to ground so if you only open one leg you could still get electrocuted by the other leg through your body to ground. That is why you need a double breaker.

    Simplified answers but I hope it helps.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: camper to house?

    Thanks again for the explanations. I understand that if you use both legs you get 220, vs 110 from 1 leg and neutral. I just thought for 220 you had to use both legs and neutral. I am a mechanic, so I have a hard time because I try to compare my household wiring to dc wiring found in the machinery I work on. I am just trying to learn the basics of residential so that I can make simple repairs myself. I still think that for any major work Ill be better off calling a competent electrician.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,558

    Default Re: camper to house?

    OK Sean123,
    You hook 2 12 volt batteries in series and get 24 volts but is you connect a third wire to the connection between the batteries you can get 12 volts from it to either of the other leads.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

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