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Thread: bathroom redo

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    3

    Exclamation bathroom redo

    i'm remodeling my bath to include a hot-tub. i'm putting moisture resistant wallboard on walls and ceiling, using mildew resistant tape on joints. i haven't found any special joint compound for this situation. does regular joint compound work.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    102

    Default Re: bathroom redo

    yes. It will work. You could use the powdered easy sand joint compound you mix yourself, but you need a 1/2" drill that turns slow and a paddle. The number on the front is the approx. set time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    tn
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: bathroom redo

    After you get your joint compound up and ready to sand smooth try this. instead of sandpaper use a damp terry towel,just dip it in some water and squeaze it till it is damp fold it in half and in half again then just wipe over the joint no dusty mess works great. after you do an area just dip the towel in water and squeaze it out again you just want it damp. good luck.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: bathroom redo

    There are basically two types of drywall compound, the setting type which is typically a mix it yourself (i.e. it comes in powder form) and the drying type which typically comes pre-mixed (i.e. green lid and blue lid). Green lid has more shrinkage so it is good for taping, it tends to suck the tape into the gaps. The Blue lid is for finishing.

    The setting type is a bit stronger and better for the bathroom but you do have to sand. The drying types can be reconstituted with water so a bathroom application is most not ideal.

    The wet towel sanding technique will only work with a drying type compound.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: bathroom redo

    Quote Originally Posted by plastrr385 View Post
    You could use the powdered easy sand joint compound you mix yourself, but you need a 1/2" drill that turns slow and a paddle. The number on the front is the approx. set time.
    I would disagree with the drill and paddle. The reason is, the average DIY'r doesn't have the skills to apply a large amount of material that is designed to set relatively quickly. Heck, I've been doing drywall for years and I don't even have the skills to apply more than a pan of 20 minute mud before it starts to harden. Yes, you can get slower setting compounds, but the same thing still applies. Why add an additional difficulty to an already tough project?

    I agree that a setting type joint compound is better to use in this situation, however, my recommendation is that it be mixed one pan at a time. This way it can be mixed to the desired consistency and if it starts to fire off in the pan it's easy to clean up and start anew. A bucket of setting mud is tough to get rid of once it starts to fire, it's easier to just get a new bucket.

    Side note: Once the tape is applied with the setting compound it is acceptable to switch to premixed topping compound to finish the joints smooth. When tiling or adding a cultured type surround, finishing the joint to a perfectly flush finish isn't necessary. Anything outside of the surround will need to be perfectly flush.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

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