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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Schertz Texas
    Posts
    3

    Default 1st Floor Bathroom Vent

    We live in a 12 year old two story house in Schertz, Texas (outside of San Antonio). Last year we found out the vent for the 1st floor bathroom vented into the space between the floors. This is the way the home builders did all the two story houses. We found out when we experienced a roof leak which caused a portion of the ceiling on the first floor to be replaced. What a smell came out of the ceiling! We replaced the fan with an internal vented one (with charcoal). However, this is not getting the job done as the small bathroom is very, very humid. So bad the enamel paint on the door is getting sticky. We have a small dehumidifer in the bathroom, but it is not helping much even though we are pulling a lot of water out of the air. The downstairs bathroom shares a wall with the garage. Don't really want to vent in the garage. My only good option (as I see it) is to run a vent from the bathroom through the space between the floors across the garage and through an outside wall. This will mean to remove some of the ceiling in the garage to run the vent and also, with a little luck, being able to put the exhaust vent above the brick on the outside. Any other options for me?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    OKC
    Posts
    247

    Default Re: 1st Floor Bathroom Vent

    Is through the garage the shortest way out, i guess the bathroom doesn't have an exterior wall? is there a shorter way to get to your attic? you could vent it into the attic assuming your attic has good ventilation.
    HOPE THIS IS HELPFUL!

    Oklahoma City, OK

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Schertz Texas
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: 1st Floor Bathroom Vent

    I believe going through the common wall into the space between the ceiling and the floor would be the shortest distance. How I wish the bathroom had a wall to the exterior of the house. I would drill through the brick with a smile on my face! Anyone recommend the type of duct I would need to get to run through a non-insulated ceiling/floor space to the outside?

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,794

    Default Re: 1st Floor Bathroom Vent

    I would use 3" round, rigid aluminum ducting. Venting to the outside is the only right way to do it. Venting a bath to any enclosed area is a recipe for mold and moisture damage.

    Was there no building authority in the area 12 years ago when the house was built? I find it hard to believe that ANY inspector would sign off on the venting prior to sheetrocking, which is required just about everywhere.

    If, as you say, all the houses in the area were built that way, you might be able to open a class action suit against the builder(s) and the building authorities. Chances are the members of the class would get $50 each while the lawyers get $5000, but it might be something to look into if it's a BIG problem. (I've never sued anybody or had need for legal advice.)
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Schertz Texas
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: 1st Floor Bathroom Vent

    Fencepost,

    Thanks for the info. Yes, they had city codes 12 years ago on this subject; however, during the initial building boom the city found themselves on the short end for the number of code inspector versus the number of houses being constructed. I would have to guess that a lot of required inspections were abbreviated and not on schedule, like they are now.

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