+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    8

    Default Lead paint removal

    Hello,

    I am posting this the second time and I would really appreciate your input.
    Two years ago I was stupid enough to remove paint from a door in my apartment. Long story short – in middle of the process I found out about lead hazards and had the door tested. The test came out as 0,14% of the paint is lead per weight. It could be somewhat higher as in the sample I gave to lab there was some woodchips that add on some weight.

    As I wrote in my first post – I have cleaned the whole apartment, vacuumed our coach like 10 times, vacuumed walls, washed courtains etc.
    The area I removed was about one fourth of the whole door.

    Is there a real concern for my toddler? What do you think? I mean it was 2 years ago, we are HEPA vacuuming apartment once a week.
    The lead is a real danger, bt it seems that the % of lead in the paint was quite small (still a danger ofcourse).

    Some of the paint went in dust while doing it, but most of it was thrown out as paint chips.

    Let me know your thoughts. I have been stressing about this severely….
    My blood test back then showed 2 micrograms per deciliter.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    7,762

    Default Re: Lead paint removal

    OK, I think you want to know why you haven't gotten an answer by now. I think that we all assume, at least I do, that your home is in Europe, and we know next to nothing about paints in Europe. If you are indeed in Europe, inquire locally.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,006

    Default Re: Lead paint removal

    Not to mention that some courses of action have been mentioned, but you seem more intent on stressing rather than doing something about it. Obviously lead paint isn't only an American problem, so avail yourself of any local agencies and if none take action yourself. I'd be more worried about a child's lead levels than my own.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Lead paint removal

    this is exactly what I am worried about - my child.
    The only action I can think of is cleaning the apartment which we have done million times by now. I also replaced the door and wallpapers in that room.
    I am from europe but we dont have anything here like you have in america in testing and advice.

    I was more asking about the levels in the paint. is 0,14% dry wight high?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Lead paint removal

    Quote Originally Posted by ed21 View Post
    Not to mention that some courses of action have been mentioned, but you seem more intent on stressing rather than doing something about it. Obviously lead paint isn't only an American problem, so avail yourself of any local agencies and if none take action yourself. I'd be more worried about a child's lead levels than my own.
    this is exactly what I am worried about - my child.
    The only action I can think of is cleaning the apartment which we have done million times by now. I also replaced the door and wallpapers in that room.
    I am from europe but we dont have anything here like you have in america in testing and advice.

    I was more asking about the levels in the paint. is 0,14% dry weight high?

    I also have taken the latest dustbag from my hepa vacuum to test for lead. It was two years ago that I did that stupid thing. lets see what it shows....

    I would not ask for help here if we had an agency for these matters.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Lead paint removal

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    OK, I think you want to know why you haven't gotten an answer by now. I think that we all assume, at least I do, that your home is in Europe, and we know next to nothing about paints in Europe. If you are indeed in Europe, inquire locally.
    Hello,
    Lead paint is lead paint in europe same as in Americas. I am looking for some insights of what are my risks and what is your opinion. Anyhow - There is noone to inquire in my country. you are far better prepped for this problem and also have far more experience.

    I have read that some paints used in USA contained up to 50% lead. is that right?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,382

    Default Re: Lead paint removal

    There are two kinds of lead; the pigment kind "litharge" white lead, red lead, which can be present in huge amounts. The second kind is lead acetate, which was an additive present in very tiny proportions, usually to help paint dry. Both are considered toxic, esp. to small kids. Lead test kits will indicate for both.
    The new-since-2009 lead mitigation regulations call for taking care that chips and dust is contained and cleaned up with specific precautions and materials. Wet-scraping or stripping methods are recommended to minimize dust creation. Use of sanders and torches is frowned upon. Torches create an immediate severe exposure risk by vaporizing lead so it can be inhaled. Heavy plastic dropcloths to catch the debris are rolled up and double-bagged for disposal. When vacuuming it's critical that a HEPA filter vac is in use. The final wash-down is done with tri-sodium phosphate which chemically binds the remaining lead dust. Personal safety gear include tyvek overalls, head covering, lead-certified dust mask, and no smoking or eating in the workspace. The workspace should be fully sealed off from other spaces by plastic sheeting and a separate "cleanup" space to contain the contamination.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,890

    Default Re: Lead paint removal

    Incidental risk of lead exposure is not likely to be harmful. You've already taken reasonable steps to mitigate exposure in your home; you are most likely OK.

    You could have your child tested for lead exposure. That will either reveal a problem, which can be treated, or relieve your fears.

    Most cases of lead poisoning have been due to continued exposure, such as drinking water from lead pipes or prolonged work exposure to lead dust. Lead-based paint that is well-secured to the surface is stable and unlikely to result in significant exposure. Of course, you don't want your children eating lead paint chips.

    From The Mayo Clinic: "For children and adults with relatively low lead levels, simply avoiding exposure to lead may be enough to reduce blood lead levels."

    However, The Mayo Clinic also says on another page, "Lead poisoning occurs when lead builds up in the body, often over a period of months or years. Even small amounts of lead can cause serious health problems. Children under the age of 6 are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, which can severely affect mental and physical development. At very high levels, lead poisoning can be fatal."
    Last edited by Fencepost; 12-08-2015 at 03:07 PM.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •