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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    1

    Default Removing a load bearing wall

    I need to remove a load bearing wall to install a counter between kitchen and dining area. I want to put a column on each end of the counter. The opening will be 12 feet with one end tying into the exterior wall and the other tying to the existing load bearing wall. The house has solid wood ceilings with 3/4 inch tongue and groove boards. The ceiling joists are on 2 foot centers. I am thinking of using 2X12's for the new supporting beam. Will this work and what would be the best way to install the new beam?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,375

    Default Re: Removing a load bearing wall

    Why and how are two perpendicular,adjoining walls both load-bearing? need framing diagram.
    If it's actually to carry the joists above, then be on the safe side and use a 3.5x14" parallam beam.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    7,762

    Default Re: Removing a load bearing wall

    Without getting into the question mentioned above, if ceiling space is an issue, consider using a steel beam (I beam), pound for pound stronger than 4x wood or gluelam.

    In any case, you will need an assessment from an engineer or at least an experienced general or framing contractor.

    Let us know about your progress.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,002

    Default Re: Removing a load bearing wall

    What are the actual loads on the wall? Without knowing I would think 2-2x12 may be a bit light to span 12'. A glue lam beam should do it. Much easier to work with than steel. Consulting someone with experience would be best.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    3,160

    Default Re: Removing a load bearing wall

    Also consider what the posts will be setting on and if that can carry the point load of each column.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,884

    Default Re: Removing a load bearing wall

    Two words: structural engineer.

    I don't know how persnickety building inspectors are where you live, but around here no inspector is going to sign off on the project without drawings from a licensed structural engineer. Even so, I'd probably start out with an experienced* framing contractor, home designer, or architect who can give you some design advice (offer to pay them for their advice, since if you're going to do it yourself they have no incentive to do a free estimate). They'll be able to give you a rough idea of what will & won't work, and maybe propose some ideas that you hadn't thought of. That should save quite a bit of time & money when you finally go to the engineer. Many engineers are great at figuring out how to make a particular design strong, but they aren't always good at making aesthetically pleasing or lowest-cost designs.

    *By "experienced" I don't just mean someone who's been doing it a long time, but someone who has an understanding of wood, design, and construction practices. There are lots of "experienced" contractors out there that can't figure out how to build something without a complete set of plans already drawn.
    Last edited by Fencepost; 01-12-2015 at 12:01 AM.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

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