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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    6

    Default Air coming out vents in side of furnace in basement

    I have a Bryant HVAC unit in my 1996 unfinished basement. There is a threaded hole in the front of the unit where cold air rushes out when the AC is on. There is also a vent on the side of the unit where heat and AC come out when unit is running. This seems a very inefficient use of resources.

    I am also considering taking the whole house humidifier off completely as the water runs constantly and I apparently have no way of turning it off. Turned the shut off valve to no avail. Hmmm.

    Any information here is welcomed!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    7,762

    Default Re: Air coming out vents in side of furnace in basement

    If you have a hole in the front of your unit that allows cold air to escape - plug it. You can use duct tape or aluminum tape for that.

    Why do you run the humidifier and then run the a/c at the same time? I don't get that part of your question.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    3,188

    Default Re: Air coming out vents in side of furnace in basement

    A basic barometer will tell you the relative humidity in your home. Take readings a few times a day

    This will tell you if you need the humidifier or not.

    Sounds like the controller for the humidifier is broken.

    I'd consider hooking the humidifier up to an electronic barometer.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,009

    Default Re: Air coming out vents in side of furnace in basement

    There is no need for a humidifier when the a/c is running. It's only used when the heat is on. The a/spends a lot of time removing moisture from the air. No need to put it back.
    If the valve won't shut off then it needs replacing. It sounds like the humidifier needs servicing. Where does the water go if it keeps running. I've never seen a humidifier with an overflow, but I'm not real familiar with them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Air coming out vents in side of furnace in basement

    Thanks for all of your help so far. The humidifier continuously ran. I believe the solanoid valve was bad. So, I actually ended up disconnecting the humidifier altogether. Even though it ran continuously, it never seemed to add enough moisture. We would run a separate unit upstairs in the winter. So, the humidifier issue has been solved.

    The AC/furnace unit has multiple outlets for the air to escape other than the actual ductwork. There is a hole near the drip pan drain line location. Looks like a possible overflow drip pan drain line. Cold air just flows out of it when the AC is on. There is also a vent on the side of the whole unit where air spills out of. Hot when furnace is on, and cold when AC is on. Not sure of the purpose of this vent. Looks like a register mounted on side of the unit. Our basement is half finished, so maybe it's to help heat that side of the basement? It's not necessary if that's the case. I have it sealed so I'm just hoping that isn't a mistake.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,897

    Default Re: Air coming out vents in side of furnace in basement

    Quote Originally Posted by HoustonRemodeler View Post
    A basic barometer will tell you the relative humidity in your home.
    Hygrometer. A barometer measures air pressure. A hygrometer measures humidity.

    I know you're not ignorant, so I'll just chalk up this little error to a brain fart.

    Many weather stations include a barometer, hygrometer, and a thermometer. Some also include a chronometer and an anemometer, but it's unlikely you'll see one with a speedometer, odometer, tachometer, inclinometer, interferometer, spectrometer, or magnetometer. By now your bullspitometer is probably rising.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

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