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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    1

    Default Crown molding on bedroom with mansard rotor line

    I want to put crown molding in my bedroom that has a mansard roof. Two walls are straight and two walls are at angle how to I join these Connors together.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    7,084

    Default Re: Crown molding on bedroom with mansard rotor line

    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    2,118

    Default Re: Crown molding on bedroom with mansard rotor line

    You can also use "Crown Drops" in the corners. I usually make my own but they are available commercially. I think this looks 'cleaner' than the added angle.

    Phil

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
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    1,180

    Default Re: Crown molding on bedroom with mansard rotor line

    You cut the angles just as you would for a room with vertical walls, the molding is still parallel with the floor; on the angled mansard walls, there will be a small tapered gap at the back of the molding because it will not sit flat. You can cut a new angle on the back of the lower edge, with a table saw or a block plane so it fits tight, or you can fill the gap with caulk, or add another small molding, such as a bead, under it to disguise the gap. In a Second Empire style Victorian, you usually cannot have too much molding.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    2,118

    Default Re: Crown molding on bedroom with mansard rotor line

    Casey, I've done two low-pitch situations similarly, but I bedded the diagonals slightly higher so that their installed 'width' matched a normal bedding for the horizontals. First bed the horizontal and mark the bottom in the corner- that is where the bottom of the diagonals go. Cut the diagonals in full-length along the bottom, then custom-cope the horizontals to fit, starting by cutting a normal cope end, then fitting together to see what to do. Takes a lot of patience and fitting, or a bit of caulk for paint grade work. What I like most is when 'knowledgable' carpenters see that and say "How the heck did you do that?" More fun is when years later they call you out of the blue saying they're trying it but can't get the heights and molding details to line up like yours did! The steeper of the two I did this way was a 4/12 and I don't think it will work much steeper. And yes the turned-out upper edge needed cutting on the back to lay flat. I use a belt sander since it wasn't critical post-installation and the tool is always handy.

    I would have mentioned this in my first reply but it may be beyond the average DIY'ers skill level. I also haven't shared this with anyone since I figured it out (but now the whole world knows my 'secret'). Crown Drops are a much easier solution which anyone can make look good with far less effort- usually a better DIY solution. And as much as I respect A.Spruce, that 'extra' angle shown in the video just about gags me- sorry!

    Phil

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,180

    Default Re: Crown molding on bedroom with mansard rotor line

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastercarpentry View Post
    Casey, I've done two low-pitch situations similarly, but I bedded the diagonals slightly higher so that their installed 'width' matched a normal bedding for the horizontals. First bed the horizontal and mark the bottom in the corner- that is where the bottom of the diagonals go. Cut the diagonals in full-length along the bottom, then custom-cope the horizontals to fit, starting by cutting a normal cope end, then fitting together to see what to do. Takes a lot of patience and fitting, or a bit of caulk for paint grade work. What I like most is when 'knowledgable' carpenters see that and say "How the heck did you do that?" More fun is when years later they call you out of the blue saying they're trying it but can't get the heights and molding details to line up like yours did! The steeper of the two I did this way was a 4/12 and I don't think it will work much steeper. And yes the turned-out upper edge needed cutting on the back to lay flat. I use a belt sander since it wasn't critical post-installation and the tool is always handy.

    I would have mentioned this in my first reply but it may be beyond the average DIY'ers skill level. I also haven't shared this with anyone since I figured it out (but now the whole world knows my 'secret'). Crown Drops are a much easier solution which anyone can make look good with far less effort- usually a better DIY solution. And as much as I respect A.Spruce, that 'extra' angle shown in the video just about gags me- sorry!

    Phil
    He has a flat ceiling, not a sloping ceiling; It's the side walls that are angled, probably under 30* off of vertical, so the molding is the same as in a normal room, just there is a unsightly gap at the bottom of the angled wall's crown for the length of the run.
    I made an awful MS Paint drawing to show where the gap is behind the crown.

    He can either remove wood so the molding has the complimentary angle, or fill it with caulk (yuk) or add another molding under it.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

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