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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    2

    Default Cork wall cover up!!

    Hi!! I am new to this forum, so hopefully I am doing this right and can get some much needed answers from you
    I have a cork wall (it is more like a really soft exposed/bare wood? just a little stiffer than cork) in a room that I am redoing as a dressing room and want to cover it up. Obviously paint is not going to cut it so I was thinking more of covering it with fabric. I have read a lot about how to cover walls with fabric using liquid starch but I don't know if that technique is going to work on this wall because the wall is porous and I believe it might just soak all the starch. What do you think? Maybe staple it? What other technique could I use? Please help. Thanks!!
    *unfortunately I am currently out of town so I can't provide a picture, sorry*

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Cork wall cover up!!

    You can install a curtain rod at the top of the wall and another at the bottom. Then you can sheer the fabric on the rod at the top and the bottom. The hardware for the rods will need to be fastened to something that can support the weight of the fabric preferably a stud either in the side walls, ceiling or behind the cork. A stud is the wood post behind the wall (drywall, paneling or whatever) that the wall is fastened to. In a newer home, they tend to be 16 inches apart. I use an inexpensive "stud finder" to locate studs. If you are spanning a long distance, the rod will need some support midway to keep from bowing.

    Fabric collects dust and while you can vacuum it, if it is sheered on a rod you can take it down and shake it out or wash it. You can stretch the fabric across, or you can gather it for a softer look.

    If your space is small, I have seen 4 x 8 foam insulation boards covered with fabric and then mounted on a wall. Keep in mind that most fabric comes 42 to 60 inches wide and most is between 42 to 45. Unlike wallpaper, the selvage edge of one piece of fabric cannot be butted up to another without cutting the fabric because the selvage edges are treated to keep from unraveling. The treated area shows up different.

    I have never tried the starch method. You can always try with a piece of fabric and see what happens.

    You can try staples but they will show and may or may not support the fabric - depends if they can get a bite into something solid enough to hold.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Cork wall cover up!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Lily View Post

    If your space is small, I have seen 4 x 8 foam insulation boards covered with fabric and then mounted on a wall. Keep in mind that most fabric comes 42 to 60 inches wide and most is between 42 to 45. Unlike wallpaper, the selvage edge of one piece of fabric cannot be butted up to another without cutting the fabric because the selvage edges are treated to keep from unraveling. The treated area shows up different.

    I have never tried the starch method. You can always try with a piece of fabric and see what happens.
    Thank you for the great suggestions Lily! I will definitely contemplate the boards idea and will make the starch-fabric test beforehand to see if that might work.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Cork wall cover up!!

    Glad to help. One source of fabric wider than 60 is to use flat sheets. Another is muslin used for quilt backing. It comes bleached and unbleached and up to 120 wide.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    201

    Default Re: Cork wall cover up!!

    Unless your heart is set on fabric, you might decorative lattice panels over the cork.
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Acurio-La...8?N=5yc1vZbqna

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,694

    Default Re: Cork wall cover up!!

    Personally I would remove the cork from the wall, patch as required and prime paint, then put whatever finish I wanted. This will require scr-aping and patching the drywall. Maybe even skim coating the wall if the drywall is too damaged. Of course some sanding to finish it up.
    Personally I would rather grab a beer and sit on the deck and listen to the radio, but sometimes you just have to go for it and do it.

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