+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    2

    Default compression angle stop valves on too tight?

    I think I might have over tightened a compression stop valve (on copper stubout). It is not leaking but I've seen comments about stress being caused by this down the road. I am ok to leave it as is if it not leaking or should this be redone?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,238

    Default Re: compression angle stop valves on too tight?

    I'd leave it, trying to loosen it will likely cause it to leak.

    Compression stops should be outlawed! They are evil! Valves with the integral supply tube should be outlawed as well.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,751

    Default Re: compression angle stop valves on too tight?

    "Compression stops should be outlawed! They are evil! Valves with the integral supply tube should be outlawed as well."

    Why?

    I use compression valves from time to time without any issues. I don't use the combo valves at all.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Montreal Canada
    Posts
    218

    Default Re: compression angle stop valves on too tight?

    as long as the compression nut does not crack you should be 0k.. Most people do not know that COMPRESSION FITTING SHOULD NOT BE USED ON TYPE L COPPER PIPE. the pipe is too strong and you will have to over tighten to stop leaks. You can remove compression valves easily by putting two wrenches of equals size and undoing the compression. Make sure the you shut off the water first.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,238

    Default Re: compression angle stop valves on too tight?

    Quote Originally Posted by bill shack View Post
    as long as the compression nut does not crack you should be 0k.. Most people do not know that COMPRESSION FITTING SHOULD NOT BE USED ON TYPE L COPPER PIPE. the pipe is too strong and you will have to over tighten to stop leaks. You can remove compression valves easily by putting two wrenches of equals size and undoing the compression. Make sure the you shut off the water first.
    Sure, that gets the valve off, but it doesn't remove the nut and crimp ring because the crimp ring has deformed the pipe. And now how do you install a new valve? Can't go back with a compression because of the distorted pipe, can't solder on a male nipple because the pipe is distorted. And, good luck finding another valve with the same thread so that you might reuse the existing nut and crimp ring.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: compression angle stop valves on too tight?

    Thanks and appreciate all the responses.

    Before I posted the question I was able to remove a few of these using a ferrule extractor.
    I ended up putting them back with new ferrules and had to over tighten them again to avoid leaks.
    If I just followed the "hand tighten + 1/2 turn" instructions they would leak (and one just blew off when I turned the water on :-(). It is possible this happened because the pipe was a bit distorted. I have PEX copper stubouts and checking up on the specs for one of them did show up as L type copper so that might explain why they required so much tightening to avoid leaks in the first place.

    I do have some room to cut the pipes a bit and maybe redo them (on non distorted pipe) or just use the sweat in types.

    But if the worse that can happen is a minor leak I can monitor that and replace as needed.

    I just want to ensure none of them blow off and cause a major leak.

    Thanks again for all the advice on this issue.

    -Michael

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,203

    Default Re: compression angle stop valves on too tight?

    I use compression stops regularly with no problems so far. Some do need to be really tight to not leak- I guess those are on type "L" copper but so long as you tighten to just where they don't leak and no more there should not be any excessive stress on the pipe. To do that kind of damage would likely crack the compression nut first as these are generally thin. As quality stops generally last at least 20+ years it's not something I'm worried about.

    Phil

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •