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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    10

    Default Replacing porch floor over basement rooms

    hg\One of the projects that my wife and I are hoping to attack this summer is the flooring on our front porch. I haven't seen a whole lot of this kind of porches in our area, and the two contractors we've talked to aren't 100% sure of the best way to tackle it.

    The foundation extends completely under the porch, making 2 "coal/cold" rooms under the porch separated by the main supporting wall in the basement. "Upstairs," the porch has brick walls on all sides with 4 brick support pillars on the front of porch. Currently, the floor is tongue and groove boards (I am assuming fir) attached directly to the joists. It is/was painted and it looks like there may have been caulk around the edges of the porch floor at one point but there isn't much left. We do have occasional water coming in on the interior walls of the basement. It hasn't been a major issue but it would be something nice the rid ourselves of.

    I'm wondering what the best way to go about replacing it would be. The one contractor that did the most looking into it said that he would basically replace it how it currently is with fir, seal it, and then caulk around the interior. He estimated it would run around $1800 including labor, materials, etc.. Seemed kind of steep to me, but he also gave us a very reasonable quote on fixing some issues with our garage so I'm not sure. He said the biggest cost was the tongue and groove fir boards as they aren't cheap. We talked about laying a subfloor and installing tongue and groove over that, he said we could try that and put a vapor barrier between the two layers but he's not sure it would make much of a difference. He said the main advantage would be the insulation and that we would be better served insulating the rooms downstairs to get the same effect, and it wouldn't likely solve the water problem.

    Below are some pictures I took from both above and below the porch. Water damage is pretty obvious.












  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Replacing porch floor over basement rooms












  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Replacing porch floor over basement rooms


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,836

    Default Re: Replacing porch floor over basement rooms

    What I would do is nail 1X furring strips on the side of the joists to hold 3/4 plywood between the loists so you create a deck the is level and even to the tops of the joists. Lay Ice Guard over that and install 1X4 furring strips on top of that to nail the decking to and allow an water sepage to run out under the decking. That of course will raise the deck about 3/4 of an inch.


    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,203

    Default Re: Replacing porch floor over basement rooms

    I have done three porch floors where there was a room under, but never one hemmed in by brick walls. I don't know where that runoff is going to go.
    The first porch floor was done with a adhesive torch-down roll roofing, topped with full 2x sleepers and the 1x4 t&g flooring. It is still watertight now in its 23d summer.
    The next one was a deck over a porch, that one got a rubber membrane roof, and removable 4'x4' sections of mahogany decking screwed/glued to mahogany sleepers. Made open to drain better, made removable so leaves/debris could be cleaned. (of course the owners have never cleaned it since 2007)
    Third one was a copper flat-soldered roof, then sleepers and decking. This raised the floor level 2 1/2", so the stairs had to be remade, etc.
    Again, if you concentrate the runoff, it needs to have some kind of scuppers/gutter system to handle it or you'll have a bigger problem. And the takeaway is this: flooring must not be applied directly over the impermeable membrane, be that rubber, special waterproofing paint, or torch down/grace ice & water shield. There must be air movement or the flooring is effectively sitting in a tray of water.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

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