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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Default GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    Hello,

    There are a few items we did not require the seller to correct prior to our moving into our current house and now that we want to sell it, we want to get it taken care of. I'd like to get information on how much it would cost us to get an electrician to do these and how long is should take. They are:

    1) install GFCI outlet in kitchen, bar, and bathrooms. How much should this cost us and how long should it take per outlet?

    2) one or more over current protection devices are "double tapped" where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. Can this be easily fixed? How much should this cost?

    3) The legend for over current protection devices in the main service panel is incomplete.

    Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
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    7,344

    Default Re: GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    You are asking us something we don't provide - prices.

    To get estimates you'll need to talk to local electricians, as estimates can vary widely from one location to another, just like other consumers' goods.

    Most electricians have set prices for certain jobs, but sometimes they switch to "by the hour" pricing. Only you can make the final decision.

    The best way to find a reliable contractor is word of mouth, so check the contractors' references carefully.

    Finally, what you are asking is fairly basic and not very complicated - it should be less than 1 million dollars.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,593

    Default Re: GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    Quote Originally Posted by kb40000 View Post
    Hello,

    There are a few items we did not require the seller to correct prior to our moving into our current house and now that we want to sell it, we want to get it taken care of. I'd like to get information on how much it would cost us to get an electrician to do these and how long is should take. They are:

    1) install GFCI outlet in kitchen, bar, and bathrooms. How much should this cost us and how long should it take per outlet?

    Are you sure there isn't already a GFC device somewhere on that circuit that protects everything else? Common locations for such things will be in the garage, half bath/bathroom, exterior outlet, etc. You'll typically find them to the closest "wet" location to the panel, but not always, just depends on how the electrician wired the house when it was built.


    2) one or more over current protection devices are "double tapped" where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. Can this be easily fixed? How much should this cost?

    Yes, this is an easy fix.

    3) The legend for over current protection devices in the main service panel is incomplete.

    This is pretty typical, either the writing wears off or it was never marked, certainly not clearly enough to be useful to anyone. I, personally, wouldn't worry about it since you are selling the house and not in need of the information.

    Thanks for your help!
    DJ is right, we can't even begin to quote you pricing on such things, as we are not in your area, and you are not hiring us to do the work for you. Contact local electricians and get bids, they may be able to give you a ballpark figure over the phone. As to how long will the work take, depends on the electrician, you're probably looking at about half a day's work or less.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    319

    Default Re: GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    The best way to find a reliable contractor is word of mouth, so check the contractors' references carefully.

    If you are in a new town or part of town, you can start by asking your agent, or even the seller's agent for a recommendation. Ask your new neighbors as well.
    It's this old house, not this built after your dad was born house.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,478

    Default Re: GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    Other than the double-tapped breakers, the rest of this is easy DIY stuff if money is an issue. The directions for wiring GFCI outlets come with them including how to run the downstream outlets. It's pretty simple. Invest a little for a simple plug-in style GFCI circuit tester to be sure you got things done correctly; it will diagnose it for you if you didn't.

    To determine which 120V breaker runs what, plug a radio into the outlet which you can hear at the panel and start flipping breakers off and on- when the music stops, that is the breaker for that outlet. Make a list on a separate piece of paper before labeling the panel to make clarity easier- you may need to write smaller on the label to get all the info in there! That same radio can help you to be sure you've killed the circuit where you're putting the GFCI outlets, but double-check with a tester before pulling the outlet.

    Phil

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    2

    Default Re: GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    Thanks everyone for your help! I find it very helpful and reassuring to know that these are minor issues to correct that shouldn't be too costly.

    A. Spruce, we will look to see if there is already a GFCI somewhere on the circuit that protects everything else. There is a GFCI in the bathroom downstairs, but I'm not sure how that would protect the upstairs.

    Phil, I will see if we can do the legend corrections ourselves and send a few electricians a copy of the page from our inspection report with additional pictures of our outlets and panel to see if they can give us estimates for the work.

    Do you all think they would be able to provide an estimate with this information or do you think I will end up paying diagnostic fees in addition to repair fees?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    7,593

    Default Re: GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    Quote Originally Posted by kb40000 View Post
    A. Spruce, we will look to see if there is already a GFCI somewhere on the circuit that protects everything else. There is a GFCI in the bathroom downstairs, but I'm not sure how that would protect the upstairs.
    Power comes to the GFCI first, then it is passed through and on to the other locations on that particular circuit. When wired in line with the downstream outlets, those outlets become protected by the GFCI.

    Someone mentioned earlier to get a plug tester, it will be invaluable for figuring out what is GFCI protected and what is not. There are a couple different testers, you want one with the GFCI test button on it, basically, it shorts the tester to trip the GFCI, but won't harm the circuit if there is not one present. The other method was also mentioned, and that was to plug in a portable radio then trip the GFCI, if the radio stays on, it isn't protected, at least not by the GFCI you're playing with.

    Again, you'll find GFCI and protected outlets in "wet" locations, so garage, patio/exterior applications, bathrooms, and kitchens. Due to the nature of kitchens, they usually have their own GFCI device, they are not daisy chained into the aforementioned locations.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    2,478

    Default Re: GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    Most electrical contractiors will give you a quote only after inspecting the job in person, which should cover and 'diagnostics'. There's simply too many variables and possibilities involved with old wiring. Because of this they may want an inspection charge for that- it's becoming more common these days because a thorough inspection takes time and if you give the job to someone else it's lost time and wages for them. As long as the charge seems reasonable and all contractors in your area are doing it, pay it.

    Get several estimates anyway. With your info they may be able to give you a rough estimate off-site but expect a wide margin given in the possible price- we all really need to see what we're up against in person to quote you a solid price.

    Phil

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    New London County, CT
    Posts
    124

    Default Re: GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    None of these are difficult.

    1. Assuming there is room in the the respective boxes it is a simple job to swap an outlet for a GFCI. You would need to know if you will be feeding any downstream boxes and is so identify the line and load wires.

    2. Again, easy job. Some wire nuts, wire and a little knowledge and it is done.

    3. This is not hard but it is time consuming. It is an item you can do for yourself. I would either work with an assistant or buy a wire tracer to help with this. An electrician will not want to use his time to complete this. I did this with my new home and it was easy. Using Word I have a legend template that identifies the circuit, its amperage and what devices are on it.

    Hope that helps.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: GFCI/ double tapped / Legend- costs to repair?

    I recently had some electrical work done to my 1950s house. I bought the house knowing that upgrades were necessary. I'm not planning on selling anytime soon, but the project was a "must" in my book.

    An old Federal Pacific panel in the kitchen was moved outside to where the main panel is located. Every outlet in the house was upgraded, whether to GFCI or not. Outlets in the bathrooms and kitchen were upgraded to GFCIs, and the rest were upgraded to regular outlets or GFCIs as the electricians saw fit. It was an expensive project for me, but because the kitchen panel was close to, if not, original to the 1950 house, I wanted it upgraded (and moved away from the sink!). The outside panel for the rest of the house was circa mid-1960s.

    I scheduled bids (vs. estimates) from 3 well-known, well-established electrical contractors recommended to me by family and friends. Two actually showed up to look at the house. Each mailed me a written bid. I preferred one contractor over the other only because of the way he spoke to me when walking through the house. I had no doubt both were competent and reputable.

    I compared the bids and the one I wanted to award the bid to ended up being $400 more than the other. I called and told him such. I told him I wanted to have him do the work but his bid was much higher. He said he would check into it and he called me back a couple hours later and knocked $400 off his bid (and sent me a new one in writing). His company was awarded the job and did a stellar, professional job. They stayed true to their final bid amount so I knew exactly what I owed.

    I hope my --long-- story helps! Question bid amounts if you see significant differences. The bids should be detailed enough where you can see pricing differences for each type of work.

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