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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    238

    Default Low-Cost Ceiling Options

    I'm trying to find low cost ceiling options for a semi-finished basement. I think the cheapest I can find is 54 cents/sq ft with drop ceiling tiles from home depot and since I already have the metal ceiling grid I would only need to purchase tiles. I was considering drywall but I'd rather keep the joist bays accessible for future wiring. Can anyone think of other options or sources?
    My advice and opinions come from hands on knowledge...and This Old House Hidden Content

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,767

    Default Re: Low-Cost Ceiling Options

    Another option: clean and spray paint the ceiling as is. A drop ceiling will make it inaccessible to work on your wiring. This is what they do in a lot of shops which are being remodeled now.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,004

    Default Re: Low-Cost Ceiling Options

    you can paint a piece of sheetrock ceiling white then cut the sheetrock into 2x2 squares and use the sheetrock in place of the drop ceiling tiles.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,203

    Default Re: Low-Cost Ceiling Options

    If you use a grid ceiling, be sure that it is rated for the weight of the tiles used and hung correctly. The standard stuff may not be rated for the weight of 1/2" sheetrock but the fire rated grid is. (I no longer have my book on these ceilings but I'm sure the info can be found) I like this stuff in basements and areas where you may want access later. If you know how, removing the 2' and 4' runners is simple. Try to arrange the main runners where they will not need to be removed for any service work. Normal tiles can be painted with latex instead of replacing them when they get dirty. In fact just about anything that will support itself can be used for tiles- 1/4" luan or paneling, sheetrock, even styrofoam. My preference in homes is for something with a bit of fire resistance (which standard tiles do have even though they are not rated as such). Fiberglass insulation can be placed on top, cut the batts to tile size and install with each tile paper down if it's faced. 2' widths are available but you may not find these at the big-box stores.

    Phil

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