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  1. #1
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    Jan 2008
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    Default Painting Appliances

    My turn to be baffled

    My kitchen appliances are fine but all white. Stove, fridge, washing machine. Not exactly bad but I'd love them to look a little less dated and I ain't going to replace them so I was thinking paint. A good alkyd oil paint would probably be durable enough though heat from the stove may be an issue. Epoxy might be better, I think they make a heat-resistant type. I don't mind the mess, the hassle, the work involved, or to a small degree the material costs

    My big problem is that the stove and washer surfaces are porcelain, not paint. Having refinished a couple tubs with epoxy I have found that it's not so much that the coating wears out (it can be re-coated), it's more of not being able to achieve a really good bond to the porcelain underneath it So has anyone done this successfully (especially a stove which gets mighty hot)?

    If I can make this work it will allow me to update the rest of the very dated kitchen I live with. Otherwise I'm going to be stuck living in a 60's time machine until it becomes 'chic' again in another 50 years or till the appliances wear out, and I don't think I can take that much longer before I have to spend the remodeling money money on a psychiatrist instead

    Phil

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
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    Iowa
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    Default Re: Painting Appliances

    There are appliance paints out there. I haven't worked with them so I will let someone else advise you there.

    What color do you plan on painting the appliances?

    White appliences are not outdated (although almond is). I even read that white could be replacing stainless as the new in thing, though I don't know about that. White is the most timeless applience color and the choice of those like myself who don't like the look or upkeep of stainless steel. Although I have seen people add some fun and whimsy with colored appliences (red, blue, pink) I think that could look dated sooner than white.

    You can get out of painting your stove hood by getting a flat under the cabinet fan and making a wood hood cover.

    Why is it the master carpenters are the last to make new cabinets for their kitchens? My sister still has avacado appliances and deteriorating 60's cabinets and her husband knows carpentry!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    Default Re: Painting Appliances

    "Why is it the master carpenters are the last to make new cabinets for their kitchens? My sister still has avacado appliances and deteriorating 60's cabinets and her husband knows carpentry!"

    Because there is an old saying: The shoemaker's kids are always bare foot.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Painting Appliances

    In my case it's because I'm renting I plan to be here for as long as I can foresee, but I'm not going to recoup any money I spend on this place. Paint and a little more is as far as I'll go spending and I haven't been able to 'scrounge' anything better to replace what I've got. It's not bad, just dated and I'm tired of looking at it staying this way!

    I can do the cabinet door updates with my router, paint the cabinets themselves, and get pull-out countertops much nicer than I've got for free, but without matching appliances it's just not worth the effort. And Lily, it's not a range hood- it's the stove itself. I wish it were just a hood, that would be easy!

    Phil

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Iowa
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    Default Re: Painting Appliances

    OK – you’re off the hook for not doing something sooner

    I came across this article on painting appliances and stoves: http://www.diynetwork.com/kitchen/ho...int/index.html

    I don’t know if it will work on porcelain - it says over metal, and it reads a little like an advertisement.

    I also read about someone who painted everything on the stove except the cook top with appliance paint. Then, they had a piece of opaque tempered glass cut to fit the top with circles cut out for the burners. That might work for a built in stovetop too. (Yes - I knew you meant the stove too - I just thought you could build a hood - one less thing to paint.) You could epoxy the sides and front of the stove etc and use glass for a cook top.

    You did not mention the sink, but since this is a rental, you could just buy a sink from a big box store. Actually, my sink came from a big box store 16 years ago (double cast iron covered with white porcelain.) They are much cheaper than a trip to a psychiatrist.

    Washer - do you mean a dish washer or washing machine? Either one gets less abuse on the outside than a bath tub. Epoxy may do the trick.

    I still want to know what color you are going for Is there stainless steel looking epoxy?

    I understand that going crazy because something is so ugly feeling. I've been known to just start pulling up carpet or ripping up wallpaper because I can't take it anymore. Hopefully, I am at home when this happens.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2008
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    Default Re: Painting Appliances

    Quote Originally Posted by Lily View Post
    OK – you’re off the hook for not doing something sooner
    I put the "Pro" in "procrastination- don't expect me to do my stuff sooner, I've got too much stuff doing for others to get time for mine I'm looking to go gloss black witgh appliances with the cabinets going near-black (some brown in the mix to soften the color) with a soft-sheen finish. Maybe granite countertops later but that will depend on what I can scrounge. Sink is stainless and will stay till I can scrounge there too. Still thinking about the hardware. Right now plain flat doors, poly over unstained pine, and groady dark brass hardware- now you see why it's got to go!

    I understand that going crazy because something is so ugly feeling. I've been known to just start pulling up carpet or ripping up wallpaper because I can't take it anymore. Hopefully, I am at home when this happens.
    No problem- when I get mt next ugly-color demo job I'll give you a call I did a floor today in a rental. The tub and surrounding tilework is a strong blue color and since it's in good shape the owner is leaving it I did get rid of the blue tile-base and I found mosaic-sized blue tiles doing the demo. Guessing about 1950 or so....UGH!

    Phil

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    199

    Default Re: Painting Appliances

    Sounds like it will be very sleek and modern

    (A dark kitchen needs good task lighting.)

    The dark cabinets and polished nickel hardware (1st pic) is similar to what I saw in many Parade homes last year.

    http://s514.photobucket.com/user/jhm...?sort=3&page=1
    Last edited by Lily; 05-14-2014 at 01:23 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Default Re: Painting Appliances

    I'm going to answer my own question here. I did the research and I've found out that there is no good way to paint a stove, and that painting any porcelain appliance finishes rarely yields lasting results.

    The problem with stoves is two-fold; the first being the heat involved. Most primers and finishes will not tolerate that and those which will are expensive and rarely come in a gloss finish. Even those which do note that the gloss isn't very likely to come out as nice as you'd like because of the nature of the paint needing to resist heat. Many reviews indicate both erratic results as well as premature wear being all too common. There are places who will re-porcelain but it's meant as a restoration thing and not worth the cost for your modern stove. better to just replace the stove with a new one in the color you want, or if it's new enough you may be able to order new surface parts with the color you want from the manufacturer and reuse the rest.

    The biggest problem I have is that in my limited space, the cabinetry is designed for a 24" mini-stove like used in efficiencies and campers, the one i have is long out of production and never came in anything but white anyway. These narrow stoves sell for a premium so unless I can find a camper pullout cheap enough like I did in my last home I'm going to be stuck with this one and I'll have to design around it. There's just not enough space here to cut the cabinets and countertops down any more. Oh well, life could be worse!

    As to the other appliances where no heat is involved, the success people get seems to be based on the use of only the best (expensive) products and their care to not nick or damage them. It seems the average life of these refinish jobs goes from a year to around 5 years at best. There are good finishes made for this which gloss out well (but can't be used on stoves) which makes it a viable option here, unlike stoves. And then again with newer models you may be able to re-skin them in the color you want.

    This may not be the end of the story. I know a man whose business is specialized paints and coatings for aircraft where skin temperatures can equal or exceed that of a stove and where durability is a major concern. I doubt his products are cheap and I know they wouldn't be rated food-safe but if I ever happen across him I'm going to ask his thoughts on the subject since he designs and makes the stuff he sells and he would know about it far better than most.

    Phil

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