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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    7

    Default Rewire Entire House

    I bought an home built in 1930. It is a complete mess. currently occupied by transients. I am going to gut the whole thing. After I pull all the old plaster off the walls everything will be exposed. I want to run new electrical in the whole house. it is a 2 story ( main floor and a basement with 3 bedrooms)

    What can I expect in terms of cost and time?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
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    Default Re: Rewire Entire House

    see my answer to your other post.....same answer applies

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Pacific Northwet
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    Default Re: Rewire Entire House

    A million bucks and a hundred years.

    Seriously, there are far too many variables and you haven't provided enough information. How big is the house? How many stories? What is the going rate for electricians in your area? Are you planning to use electric heat or some other fuel source? Are you going to do the work yourself? Too many unknowns to get even an educated guess in an 0nline forum.

    For a 2000 square foot home with gas heat doing the absolute minimum you could spend $3000 just on materials. You could spend double that. You could spend half that. Calling some electricians for estimates will be your best bet, even if you plan to do the work yourself.

    Now if you have any questions on the best way to do something, we can probably help you there.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    7

    Default Re: Rewire Entire House

    thank you very much for the replies.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    136

    Default Re: Rewire Entire House

    Hi, If you are going to rewire then I would use #10 wire to keep your electric bill lower, forget about the #14 and #12 wire. Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,836

    Default Re: Rewire Entire House

    Quote Originally Posted by MtMan54 View Post
    Hi, If you are going to rewire then I would use #10 wire to keep your electric bill lower, forget about the #14 and #12 wire. Thanks
    WHAT??????? The additional cost of the cabling will out cost years and years of savings.
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    6,736

    Default Re: Rewire Entire House

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    WHAT??????? The additional cost of the cabling will out cost years and years of savings.
    Not to mention the difficulty in working with #10 wires.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Pacific Northwet
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    1,661

    Default Re: Rewire Entire House

    Quote Originally Posted by MtMan54 View Post
    Hi, If you are going to rewire then I would use #10 wire to keep your electric bill lower, forget about the #14 and #12 wire. Thanks
    I don't know what you're smoking, but it's certainly not #12 or #14 wires unless you're trying to run 30A loads on them.

    Wires don't consume electricity; they transmit it. A larger wire isn't going to be any more energy efficient than a wire that is properly sized for the load. The size of the wire isn't going to change your electric bill any more than reducing the number of outlets installed in your home.

    What a larger wire will be is more expensive and harder to work with. For fixed lighting circuits, you can use #14 wires and limit the load to about 12A (even though the circuit is rated for 15A, the NEC requires a continuous load not exceed 80% of the circuit rating). Except for kitchens & bathrooms, receptacle circuits may be wired with #14 (on a 15A breaker) though #12 (with a 20A breaker) is a good idea.

    Having light fixtures on separate circuits from receptacle outlets is a very, very good idea. That way, when a breaker trips, you'll still be able to have light in the room whether from the fixture or a portable lamp.

    There is no point in running oversized wire unless the circuit is an excessively long run (~100 feet; there are voltage drop calculations you can do but that's beyond the scope of this discussion). You're not allowed install 15A or 20A receptacles on a 30A circuit anyway.
    Last edited by Fencepost; 04-09-2014 at 01:56 PM.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Rewire Entire House

    Great reply above, I was thinking how can bigger wire save money! In fact I have heard using bigger wire that is not properly rated for the load you are putting on it, can have negative effects and 'draw' more causing heat? or other issues. Meaning if you are putting a load that could easily run on a 12 or 14/2 wire on a 10, might cause more draw etc. Again I am not an expert.

    Anyways here are my questions.

    How do you determine to run 12 or 14/2 in the house? I need to re-wire my entire house as well. I know for kitchen where there will be toasters, water kettles, and more running appliances you wold want to probably use 12/2 between 2, 20 amp circuits??

    Other general question

    I like the idea of having all the lighting on one circuit and outlets on another.

    so I know you can't exceed 80% of total circuit load. So If I take 2 bedrooms, each running a computer (700 Watt PSU /120 = 5.8 Amps), clock radio maybe a few other electronics but nothing out of normal besides the higher wattage computers, maybe another laptop running at 90Watts = .75 Amp, alarm clocks .041 amps, misc stuff etc... I shouldn't have more than 12 amps consumed at any given time. That fits under the 80% continuous load code. Would I be fine using 1, 15 Amp circuit running both of those rooms for the outlets? I would imaging I could run at least 3 rooms on another 15 amp circuit for the lighting. (3 rooms no more than 100 watt lighting) - I could probably run 4 rooms?

    Any thoughts here on this?

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