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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014

    Default Abrasive blades for ripping laminate flooring

    I am doing a remodel on an older park model travel trailer (less than 200 sq ft easily). I have researched blades on the net and I understand that a decent 40/60+ tooth, carbide tipped blade will do the job since the cuts should will be under the molding anyhow (the operative word being "SHOULD" ). I was just wondering if anyone has ever tried using an abrasive non-ferrous abrasive blade for ripping laminate flooring? I have several of those for my circular saw. I have a mitre saw for the end cuts but I was wondering about the rip cuts, would an abrasive blade work ok?
    Thanks for any input.
    Last edited by xdrummer61; 03-27-2014 at 10:40 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007

    Default Re: Abrasive blades for ripping laminate flooring

    Yes, it will work fine, if you like the look and smell of smoke and burned boards. Let me ask you this, when you want to cut a piece of paper, do you use an eraser or do you use a sharp edged object?

    Blade Selection 101:

    Determine the type of material you are trying to cut.

    1 - If it is wood, you need a sharp toothed blade,
    2 - if metal, you need a special abrasive blade for that specific type of metal (ferris or non-ferris ).
    3 - If it is composite, concrete, formica, corian, there is a blade type that is made for these materials.

    If you are cutting wood, are you cross cutting (across the grain ) or ripping (with the grain )?

    1 - For a good cut in general, you need a sharp blade. For minimal tear-out, especially for cross-cutting, you want more teeth, for ripping you want fewer teeth.

    What kind of saw are you using?

    1 - Battery powered saws typically cut better and last longer with finer blades (more teeth )
    2 - Electric saws usually have enough torque that tooth count matters less, however tooth count will still affect cut quality, as will sharpness of the blade.

    Warning! Dull blades are dangerous. PERIOD! They cause more friction and heat, which warps the blade and causes kick-back. A good blade will always produce a better cut. The higher quality the blade, the better the saw will work and the better the finished cut will be.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

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