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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    1

    Default what are the alternatives when you are missing a battery charger for cordless drills?

    I have a Ryobi 6 volt HP61 cordless drill, without a battery charger. It takes a 440001 ryobi 6 volt battery charger. I can not find one in searching the internet because they all say this charger has been discontinued. I have a plug in 12 volt adapter that I plugged in to the drill. It charged the battery, but I was afraid to leave it in very long as I don't know if I will ruin the 6 volt battery. ANYBODY KNOW?. THANKS. JOHN.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,941

    Default Re: what are the alternatives when you are missing a battery charger for cordless dri

    John, it's time you upgrade your drill to something other than a Ryobi. There are a number of brands and styles out there that will suit your needs and work much better.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,565

    Default Re: what are the alternatives when you are missing a battery charger for cordless dri

    As long as the power adapter has the same output voltage (6V), same or larger amp capacity, the same current (DC or AC) as the original, and a compatible connector (+ or - on the tip), you can use it.

    You might be able to get something from Radio Shack. They have some universal power adapters, and a selection of different adapter plugs.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Montreal Canada
    Posts
    187

    Default Re: what are the alternatives when you are missing a battery charger for cordless dri

    You could look for a charger at pawn shops.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,698

    Default Re: what are the alternatives when you are missing a battery charger for cordless dri

    Trying to maintain out of production battery operated tools can get very expensive, good money after bad so to speak.

    I have switched all my cordless tools out with the Ryobi 18v one+ system and am very happy with it. I started with the first nicad tools and now use the newer LiIon batteries in all of them. But, they have been around for a while and there are limitations, the 18v saws don't work as well as you would hope. The LiIon helped.

    Ryobi is now working on a 40v system. Right now it is just for lawn and garden tools but they really work well. I have a 40v string trimmer with the pole saw attachment and a 40v chainsaw. I am impressed with their power. so if I were in the market right now, I'd have to ask how long before Ryobi drops the 18v system and goes 40v across the board. I'd hate to have to buy all new tools again.

    But technology marches on so someday the 18v drills will be obsolete, no matter what brand you buy.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,321

    Default Re: what are the alternatives when you are missing a battery charger for cordless dri

    I think like Spruce: It's time to upgrade to something more modern, powerful and dependable.

    Your search will cost you more, in time and gas and money, than a new set. Doesn't have to be Makita or Milwaukee. Just up to date. Check on line or at the stores - they have deals where ever you look.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,915

    Default Re: what are the alternatives when you are missing a battery charger for cordless dri

    Quote Originally Posted by JHMOONEY View Post
    I have a Ryobi 6 volt HP61 cordless drill, without a battery charger. It takes a 440001 ryobi 6 volt battery charger. I can not find one in searching the internet because they all say this charger has been discontinued. I have a plug in 12 volt adapter that I plugged in to the drill. It charged the battery, but I was afraid to leave it in very long as I don't know if I will ruin the 6 volt battery. ANYBODY KNOW?. THANKS. JOHN.
    There is something of a science in dealing with rechargeable batteries, especially the LIon ones which are quite sensitive to being charged properly. Even the old NiMh and NiCad ones like reasonable charging limits. What I am about to pass along does not apply to anything but NiCad and NoMh batteries- do not try this with LIon batteries as lithium fires are a bugger to extinguish and once the thermal-runaway process starts with them there is no stopping it! Reference the Boeing 787 problems to understand how easily this can happen, and that with very good engineers involved

    When the proper charger is made of unobtainium, you can often get by by using a rectified wall-wart which supplies about 15-20% higher voltage than the nominal battery voltage so long as you monitor the battery temperature and disconnect (or use a lower charging voltage and or current level) if it gets too hot. If you are familiar with the warmth to touch with the original charger operation, that is your guide here. If not then hazard a guess but err on the safe side. Connect as you can with correct polarity, then plug in. Monitor the feed wire warmth as well as the battery, and never leave the set-up unattended. Trial and error will tell you how long to charge this way. If you're handy with electronics you can find generic charger circuits 0nline, just match the battery type, voltage, and capacity. This is a far safer approach but with added expense. Many warnings doing this the simple way: overheated batteries can explode or leak; temps will rise quickly when nearing full-charge; improper charging will shorten battery life; wall-warts and their wires may burn out or melt if overloaded; some wall-warts do not output DC but AC- you gotta read the label on them; always wear eye protection when trying this; be ready to put out a battery fire; and last but not least be ready to cut AC power quickly by means other than pulling the wall-wart with may be too hot to handle. I'm sure I've missed a few others somewhere.

    You're on your own if you try this, but I've had some decent success doing this along with several burned out wall-warts that couldn't handle the current and a few killed batteries too. Use this only as a stop-gap to give you time to save money: if your battery powered device is that far along in life you really need a new one- really!

    Phil

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