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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    4

    Default Sunroom flooring problem

    The St. Louis heat of last summer and bitter cold of winter has done a number on my linoleum flooring tiles in my sunroom. The tiles are coming up at the corners and looks awful. The room is an addition that is open underneath outside with enough space to store chairs etc. What is the best way to get up the tiles (when I try, they tear) but more importantly, what material should I use to replace the tiles that is relatively inexpensive and something I can do myself that will last.
    It's 16ft long X 6ft. So it's not huge. BUT that same crappy tile is in my kitchen, so the same material will eventually used in there as well.

    Thank you for the advice!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    202

    Default Re: Sunroom flooring problem

    Unfortunately, the only way I know how to remove flooring that is put down with adhesive is to pull up what you can and then scap er the rest off. I used an ice scap er. – You probably have one after this winter – on a pole like a shovel but with a metal end with a sharp edge. It is hard work. Is your flooring adhered right to the subfloor?

    How old is your floor? Some linoleum has asbestos in it and shouldn't be removed by a DIYer. If the floor dates after 1978, you are probably OK taking it up. Otherwise, there is a test kit to send a piece of flooring away for testing.

    Sometimes, flooring people will put down a ¼ layer of a plywood type stuff called luan and staple that to the subfloor before they put a linoleum or vinyl floor down. If this is the case then, you set a circular saw to cut 1/4 + the height of the flooring, cut the floor into large squares and pull up the luan with a crowbar. Do not cut into the subfloor. The floor and luan come up together. Do you know what layers there are to your floor?

    I cannot make a good flooring recommendation. My mudroom is partially over the basement and partially over a porch we enclosed. The porch floor was cement and poured with the foundation – so it will not move, but the floor on that half of the room gets very cold. In the mudroom I have a floating Pergo laminate that mimics the hardwood floor in the majority of the main floor. It has done fine. I wouldn’t want it in my kitchen just because I am not a big fan of laminate, but it has been a sturdy floor. It was easy to install, but also installation rates for laminate are pretty low in my area ($1 -$2 per square foot.) I had help from a carpenter. You will need a power saw of some kind to cut it. There are YouTube videos showing how.

    Carpet would work in the sunroom, though not a good idea for the kitchen.

    I don’t know about tile – there is tile outside the entrance doors to the local mall – so maybe some instillations can handle extremes in temperature. If you are thinking of tile, post your question at the John Bridge Tile Forum. They are very nice to ladies over there. If you use a tile larger than 2 inches, you can use a Ditra underlayment instead of cement board and installing the tile will be much easier. The tiles can be any price range, but the expense of thinset, grout, trowels, buckets, – it adds up. A floating laminate is probably less expensive and easier to install – definitely faster.

    I hope some of the construction guys here can give you more exact advice.
    Last edited by Lily; 03-24-2014 at 10:15 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Sunroom flooring problem

    Thank you Lily for responding!

    I'm not getting much help I think the tiles are pretty new; I have 4 extra tiles and it seems that they were bought at Lowes. This should be interesting to see what is underneath it. (probably sheet linoleum) At least that is what I found in the kitchen where those are coming up in spots.

    Thank you for giving me some direction on where to start

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    202

    Default Re: Sunroom flooring problem

    I remembered that the owner of the cabin we rent in Minnesota put wood laminate floors in a few years ago. The cabins are shut up for the winter, so experience some extreme cold, and the floors are doing fine. Also I said that I didn’t care for laminate, but a fiend of mine has a very attractive wood laminate floor in her kitchen.

    Depending on the state of the underlying floor or floors laminate can sometimes be installed over an existing floor. Tile can to, but there are pretty exact specifications for doing that. Tile is less forgiving of an inadequate subfloor and underlayment - all that work and then it starts cracking. Once you know better how many layers of flooring and what you think they are, post again for how to deal with them. It is usually best to remove floors and get back to subfloor, but it is also best not to try to pull up linoleum with asbestos in it.

    I used to live in Webster Groves many years ago – love St. Louis. I pulled up my first floor there!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Sunroom flooring problem

    Thank you Lily for responding!

    I'm not getting much help I think the tiles are pretty new; I have 4 extra tiles and it seems that they were bought at Lowes. This should be interesting to see what is underneath it. (probably sheet linoleum) At least that is what I found in the kitchen where those are coming up in spots.

    Thank you for giving me some direction on where to start

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Sunroom flooring problem

    I love Webster Groves.....very nice area.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,977

    Default Re: Sunroom flooring problem

    Are these self-stick tiles or are they VCT ones set in the proper mastic? The usual self-stick tiles of today are total crap and any improperly applied flooring little better. Flooring warranties are essentially useless since they don't cover labor which is usually the biggest expense involved so don't place much value in them.

    You can scr@pe up the old stuff, sometimes a heat gun helps but be careful with that so you don't get burned or start a fire. Use the least amount of heat which works- more is not better here. Solvents may help too- again care in use is essential. As to the replacement type: that will vary based on your skill level and desires. Sheet goods are not hard to do when you know how but are beyond a basic skill-set, and VCT tiles have their own set of issues (ungroutable so edge lines can discolor etc). Floating laminates are fairly easy but cheap ones don't last and again there's you skill to consider. So other than helping with removal there's not much else which anyone can do to help you until you decide what you're going to put back!

    Phil

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