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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    3

    Default Prep work before painting

    Greetings everyone!

    I am currently working on renovating a bedroom of a split-level house built around the 60s. I removed all of old trim from the windows, doorway, and closet. There is a thick layer of paint where the old trim met the wall forming a slight bump. Should I smooth this out before installing new trim? Should I sand it? Should I use joint compound, spackle, etc.? I am not sure if the paint underneath is lead based, but I would prefer not to sand and expose that layer of paint from when the house was built.

    Thanks in advance for any advice and suggestions!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,969

    Default Re: Prep work before painting

    Is the new trim wider, the same width or narrower than the old trim?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,004

    Default Re: Prep work before painting

    use a putty knife to sc**** the bump off and hand sand if needed to keep the dust down. install the new trim then caulk where the trim meets the wall. paint the trim then you can cut a nice straight line of paint down the wall where it meets the trim.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Prep work before painting

    The new trim will either be the same width or wider. (I haven't picked it yet.)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Prep work before painting

    MLB,

    I actually started down this route, but found that some paint was coming off in large chips down to the plaster. How should I even out these chips?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,190

    Default Re: Prep work before painting

    Carefully sc**** the paint ridges as flat as possible, then install your same width or wider trim. When you caulk the new trim, it will hide the remnant of the old paint line. If the new trim is narrower, then you'll want to scrap it as flat as possible, then float with drywall topping compound, lightly sand to blend everything together nicely.

    Large peeled patches, remove what is loose, then float the area with topping compound and sand smooth. Multiple thin layers work better than single thick layers. Don't be too aggressive with your sanding, just enough to blend the patch into the wall.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,736

    Default Re: Prep work before painting

    In painting, prep work is more important than the paint job itself.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,808

    Default Re: Prep work before painting

    If the walls are off drywall, simply slice through the drywall paper just outside the ridge of old paint, peel back the outer white layer of drywallpaper, leaving the brown pulpy paper beneath. Seal down this pulpy paper with oil Kilz or shellac based BIN. After dry, patch the area with a couple coats of drywall mud and then sand . A dampened sponge wiped over the edge will give you a perfect transition to the old wall. Prime it , then hang your trim.

    These ridges can be difficult to get rid off. They are formed by several coas of paint, usually mostly latex which does not sand well.As you pointed out, there is always the possibility of a little lead paint in a house of this age. You will have cut away such lead, rather than have sanded it.
    Last edited by ordjen; 03-18-2014 at 01:45 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Ontario, CA
    Posts
    32

    Default Re: Prep work before painting

    It is extremely important to do all the prep work before you start to paint.You can simply sand out the extra trimmings and make it as flat and smooth as possible to get the best results.Try and do everything patiently so that you do not overdo the sanding.Then try and caulk the trim,which I feel should be wider than the earlier one so that it will hide the line the old paint and give it a new finished look.Try and work the paint in thin layers rather than doing one thick layer to give it a neat look.

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