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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    52

    Default Peeling Bathroom Paint

    Hello,

    My upstairs, rather small, bathroom has a walk-in shower. The ceilings are fairly low, so there is only about 12-14 inches between the top of the shower and the ceiling.

    The paint on the ceiling above the shower is bubbling and peeling a bit. I'd like to repaint and have a few questions.

    1) A friend's husband told me to use Acri-Shield to paint. Would this be appropriate?

    2) How do I get the peeling, bubbling paint off of the drywall without making another issue with an uneven paint surface?

    There is an exhaust fan in the bathroom.

    At some point I need to have the shower totally replaced because the door isn't the correc door for it and it falls off occaisionally. At that time I can look at installing something totally different if needed, although I am not sure what would work with the ceilings being low. I am about 5'8' and if I stand on my tippy-toes, the tips of my fingers can touch the ceiling.

    Please let me know what you think.

    Thanks,
    Loreen

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,762

    Default Re: Peeling Bathroom Paint

    What you have is a failure of your ventilation system in the bathroom. I hope that your remodeling plans include a new fan, much more powerful and efficient than the one you have now (look into Panasonic fans). BTW, do you have a window?

    As far as the paint is concerned, it's really up to you: If the drywall is in decent condition, just clean the old paint, sand, then sand again, repair and smooth. Prime and paint twice. You don't need Acri-shield, unless you want to of course.

    So as you can see, it's a lot of manual work in making the surfaces smooth and ready for paint.

    Now, if it were me, I'd wait till the total remodel job.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,243

    Default Re: Peeling Bathroom Paint

    The peeling paint is a moisture issue, get that area vented better, or at the very least, get a desk fan to circulate the air in the bathroom (door open, of course ) after each shower.

    As to repair, scr-ape off the loose stuff, then float out the ceiling with drywall compound. Lightly sand between coats until you get the desired smoothness. If there is texture, you can apply new texture after it is floated and sanded smooth. Once all this is done and dry, apply two coats of Bull's Eye 123 primer and two coats of your paint of choice, semi-gloss/gloss paints hold up and protect better in moist environments. As DJ said, you do not need Acry-Shield, but it won't hurt anything if you use it.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Peeling Bathroom Paint

    Thank you!

    There is a window in the bathroom that is open when the weather permits. The exhaust fan is old, so it needs to be changed for sure.

    In the meantime, though, I will get a small fan to put in there.

    Thanks again!

    Loreen

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Peeling Bathroom Paint

    We have similar tiny bathroom (corner shower, corner toilet and single sink with just enough room to stand.) We had problem with peeling ceiling paint as well. We sc****d down everything, put sealer on it then painted with bathroom paint. We have an exhaust fan but it's sounds like a jet engine when you are in the enclosed shower so I usually don't run it. Instead I leave the shower door open for a while after I leave the bathroom. It's a twofer - helps moisten the air in the rest of the house in the winter and drys out the bathroom. In the warmer months I will open the bathroom window as well. Taking short showers helps too.

    The remodel of this bathroom is on our to do list but since it's working it keeps getting put off in favor of other more urgent projects.

    FYI - our exhaust fan is rather new. It sounded quiet in the store. It's not too loud in the other bigger bathroom where we installed the same model. I think the fact that it is directly over the enclosed shower in a very small bathroom with low ceilings just makes it loud. When I remodel this bathroom I will move the placement of the fan even though directly above the shower is the most efficient place for it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,243

    Default Re: Peeling Bathroom Paint

    Quote Originally Posted by CeliaP View Post
    FYI - our exhaust fan is rather new. It sounded quiet in the store. It's not too loud in the other bigger bathroom where we installed the same model. I think the fact that it is directly over the enclosed shower in a very small bathroom with low ceilings just makes it loud. When I remodel this bathroom I will move the placement of the fan even though directly above the shower is the most efficient place for it.
    Check the mounting of this fan, if it's loose or otherwise compromised, then excess vibration is amplified, creating the noise level you speak of. Another possible issue is excessive play in the shaft of the motor, which can be shimmed to a minimum and reduce overall noise.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,762

    Default Re: Peeling Bathroom Paint

    I had to deal with a noisy fan once. It ended up being a bent fan housing, which I easily fixed.

    Disassemble the fan and re-install it, maybe that will solve the noise problem.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,203

    Default Re: Peeling Bathroom Paint

    When a new fan is noisy, I've found that 1 time in ten the mounting is loose, and 9 times in ten someone either shoved it into a too small hole and bent it, twisted it by over-tightening the mount screws, or it got in a bind when tightening the mount screws. All of the latter indicate a bent or distorted housing which can be straightened or sometimes will straighten itself when relieved of the binding condition.

    Start with the mount screws- tighten if loose and see what happens. If still noisy loosen mount screws on one side while watching the housing. If the housing springs away staying with the head of the screw and can't be easily pushed back with one finger, it's in a bind. Either leave those screws a bit loose or shim. If the first side seems OK do the other similarly. If it's still noisy make sure that no sheetrock is touching the housing causing a twist. If there is you can saw it out from underneath or on top with a sheetrock or keyhole saw, leaving the width of a sawblade all round when done. It should be quiet now but if not you'll need to pull it and check closely for housing distortion. While it's out run it and if it's quiet now, that's a sure sign that the problem is in the mounting so watch how it goes back in making sure to not distort it- you may have to shim somewhere to get things right. Now it will be as quiet as it's supposed to be!

    Phil

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