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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1

    Cool Bath Room Plastic Tiles

    I have those plastic tiles in my bathroom that were popular in the 50's. I can easily take the plastic tiles off but what is the best way to take the glue off?

    I have heard heat gun or cut the old plaster board out. Are there any other options?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,694

    Default Re: Bath Room Plastic Tiles

    Heat should help.

    Wear protection, you never know what's in that stuff.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Bath Room Plastic Tiles

    An oscillating tool with a sc****r blade that would make short work of that. I can't believe how much I have used mine.
    However...dj1 is right: there's all manner of toxic nastiness in old floors and walls, namely lead and asbestos--and having it professionally removed is very costly. If you proceed on your own, you might want to wear a really good respirator--not a cheap face mask.

    Another option: I used to have a neighbor with those tiles. She simply primed, then painted over them. It looked great!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    104 monmouth way ,Clifton Park, NY 12065
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Bath Room Plastic Tiles

    I think heat gun is better than cutting the old board. Try it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    New London County, CT
    Posts
    120

    Default Re: Bath Room Plastic Tiles

    We have those tiles on the walls and ceiling. My experience has been that mineral spirits will take off small amounts. Doing the entire bath just will not work. You might see if you can use sheet rock spackle to skim the voids and get a look good enough to paint. I think new sheet rock may be the only real way to make the walls usable.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,194

    Default Re: Bath Room Plastic Tiles

    I just finished re-doing a room with glued-on paneling, a lot more area, and I wish I had just demo'ed the thing and re-hung new sheetrock, or overlaid it with 3/8 sheetrock and refinished it. Heat will help but you're going to either be spending time skimming most of the walls or moving so slow to avoid damage that you wish you hadn't started.

    My choice would be demo and new moisture-resistant sheetrock, faster and less trouble but messier.

    Phil

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