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  1. #1
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    Feb 2014
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    Default Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    Purchased house 12 years ago. House remodeled and build onto at that time. When we moved in, this 25' by 12' section matched the rest of the house. Slowly over the years the siding has faded and become lighter. It is the perfect size fade, like someone masked and painted a lighter paint to form a large rectangle. In the middle, it shows where a window use to be, which is faded a slightly different tint. Know the manufacture, because the home builder left a box in the basement. This section faces the west, so gets south/west sun in summer.

    My questions, if anyone knows: Is this where the house was left with no insulation, causing it to heat more in the sun? I've wanted to take off the siding and see what it looks like behind it, will it break? Has anyone seen this before? Any help appreciated.

    Thanks
    Last edited by jerimiah74; 02-11-2014 at 10:22 PM. Reason: Want to add 2 pictures.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    Why not just paint the siding all one color ?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    Don't fiddle with old siding, wood, vinyl or other kinds, because you never know what damage you will cause. Unless you're ready to rip it off.

    Painting will cover it, and if it bothers you so much - replace it.

  4. #4
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    Welcome to the world of vinyl siding. The only remediation will be replacement, as paint and vinyl siding don't get along too well. My neighbor painted his vinyl siding and it literally melted off the side of the house.

    If it were my house, the vinyl would be torn off and the original siding restored or stucco'd, depending on what the original was.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    No idea why the siding faded like that, but a nondestructive way to find out if it is insulated is have someone look at it with an infrared camera. I personally like vinyl siding for its low maintenance qualities, but nothing lasts forever. There is a difference between high quality vinyl and low end stuff.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    I've painted my house which has vinyl siding and the paint still looks great 5 or 6 years later. I do power wash the house every spring, so I know the paint isn't going anywhere.

    I have another home where I painted the vinyl on one side of the house only. Its still fine three years later.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    Default Re: Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    Vinyl siding actually takes 100% acrylic paints very well. It doesn't even require a primer. The one thing you have to be aware of is to NEVER use a darker color than that originally used by the manufacturer. PVC can start distorting at as little as 130 degrees. If the siding is painted a dark color, such as a dark green or charcoal, the heat absorbtion on a hot summer day can totally and permanently warp the siding!

    Similarly, you may have noticed that you will never see a window constructed of PVC in a dark color. Same problem. Heat distorts the plastic and breaks the window seals.

    I have also seen pictures of a house with vinyl siding where the next door neighbors installed reflective sun glass in their windows. The reflected heat from the neighbors windows permanently warped the siding on the house. You could actually see how the reflected heat from the sun had arced across the siding, warping it.

    This all being said, I do believe plastic siding has its place. When properly installed, it can last for many years with minimal maintenance. I remember years ago TOH rehabbed a three flat in Boston under some subsedized program for low income people. It was decided to use plastic siding because of its lower initial cost and the lower routine maintenance.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by ordjen View Post
    Vinyl siding actually takes 100% acrylic paints very well. It doesn't even require a primer. The one thing you have to be aware of is to NEVER use a darker color than that originally used by the manufacturer. PVC can start distorting at as little as 130 degrees. If the siding is painted a dark color, such as a dark green or charcoal, the heat absorbtion on a hot summer day can totally and permanently warp the siding!
    This may have been my neighbor's problem, as it was a faded yellow that he painted sort of a charcoal green/brown.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    Could be Spruce. I have seen this happen myself. I was leaving a restaurant a few weeks ago and noticed that the building next door had horribly warped siding. I walked over to get a better look. It was white vinyl siding that had been painted dark green. Worse, it was on a west facing wall so that it got the full afternoon sun.

    I actually took a picture of it to show my colleaques what can happen and to always warn customers about the dangers of painting plastic too dark.

    I also went out on a complaint call from a customer who was having troubles with a door they had bought from my store. It was a metal door with a plastic moulding around the almost full glass panel. Again, they had painted the plastic dark brown and the door faced due west. The plastic was moving and warping. I personally consider it a design defect from the manufacturer. PVC shouldn't be used for such purposes. If plastic is to be used, it should be the more stable fiberglas reinforced type.

    I also worked on a house where the owner had placed full glass storm doors over his steel front doors. Unfortunately, the decorative panels on those doors were made of PVC. The heat build up behind the storm doors was such that the plastic panels literally started to droop as if they were melting. We removed all the plastic mouldings and duplicated them with wood moulding in the exact same pattern.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Vinyl siding faded, shows where old window use to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by ordjen View Post
    I personally consider it a design defect from the manufacturer. PVC shouldn't be used for such purposes. If plastic is to be used, it should be the more stable fiberglass reinforced type.

    When all else fails, read the instructions.


    On every door I've seen, especially with plastic trim, there's a little sticker telling you to not paint the door or molding a dark color. That's good advice for any door and it used to be common knowledge, but alas- today's designers are taught nothing about what they're doing beyond the aesthetic issues Some of those little stickers also tell you there's no guarantee against the plastic yellowing and that it must be painted to prevent that, yet I see a lot that never got that paint! The plastic isn't terribly bad when used in the proper way within it's limits and that can be said of nearly every material. It's cheap, and that's it's best quality which says it all.

    Ditto on full acrylic paint and vinyl- as long as the vinyl isn't chalky it works very well. If it is chalky, that means the plasticizers in the vinyl are gone and it's time for new vinyl. All plastics degrade over time as the chemicals in them leach out, and those chemicals cannot be replaced without heat and pressure, so don't buy into products that claim to 'restore plastic"- it simply cannot be done. Contrary to popular belief, vinyl siding is not permanent, just long-lived with proper care, and best in light colors.

    Phil

    Phil

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