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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    4

    Default Hump in the floor - Truss pushed up

    I have been trying to find a good way to fix this problem for years, and here is what my issue is. When our house was built, the builder installed a door frame for our interior basement door at the bottom of the stairs to the basement. When they built the door frame, it was about 3/4" taller than the bottom of the floor trusses in the basement. But the people that installed this door frame went ahead and jammed it under the floor truss, and the result is a hump in the dining room floor.

    I have since shortened the door frame, but the truss has not settled down to a level with the rest of the floor. So what I need to do is to pull the top of the truss down and keep it down so that the floor is flat. We want to replace the cheap wood flooring in our dining room and kitchen area, possibly with tile, and we need to remove this hump before we put in new tile. Any ideas out there?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    6,615

    Default Re: Hump in the floor - Truss pushed up

    When you are talking about trusses, I assume you mean floor joists. Photos will help. To load photos, go to a host like photobucket

    Your timing is perfect, since you will be changing your floor and subfloor.

    What you need is a framer to either trim the bulgy joist or replace it.

    Before you decide on tile, you need to make sure that your joists will be able to handle the weight. If you go to johnbridgetileforum.com you'll find a formula to determine your floor DEFLECTIN. Plug in your measurements and see if your joists are good to go. If not, you'll need to beef them up.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
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    1,185

    Default Re: Hump in the floor - Truss pushed up

    Hi,
    I think you may find that the door frame (was this just the jambs or also the stud/frame that held them?) was supporting that joist (or are we actually talking floor trusses?) and with that extra support, it is the only one of the set that did not (was not allowed to) settle/sag. So you are only perceiving a "high spot" because it's the last joist standing in its original position, while its partners have sagged to either side, with no additional support.
    In any case, whatever the cause, it is a very hard problem to address. I can think of two solutions; remove the plywood subfloor over a significant area, plane down the top of the joist until it's level with the rest. OR sever the high joist entirely and things will settle down pretty fast, if they need more convincing, pile concrete block or sandbags above until it seems flat. Then sister the old joist with a new timber and plenty of fasteners as appropriate, etc. This is _not_ an option if in fact we are talking about actual floor trusses, using your terminology. Trusses cannot be modified in the field, but planing a small amount from the top chord while not ideal is probably acceptable if it's not too extreme. To sister a truss you would need an engineer-stamped drawing or you would be looking at a failed home inspection down the road. Unless it was so well buried under finishes... just sayin'.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    2,128

    Default Re: Hump in the floor - Truss pushed up

    Quote Originally Posted by Sombreuil_mongrel View Post
    Trusses cannot be modified in the field, but planing a small amount from the top chord while not ideal is probably acceptable if it's not too extreme.
    Casey

    While I tend to agree here, if it's a hump you can notice then removing it will probably take away quite a bit of wood. Trusses cannot be modified without an engineered drawing period, joists however are an entirely different story. Wood is not a static building material and I've seen joists that bowed both upward and downward significantly for less-than-obvious reasons. With the location you mentioned, the temperature variation at the stairwell could affect a trusses shape factor compared to it's siblings. Whatever the solution is here, I'd want to see that joist or truss cross-braced to it's partners on either side to help prevent a recurrence. Once again if it's a truss you'll need to consult a truss engineer on how to do this as they are very specific on how this is to be done with each different type. Both the repair and the bracing can be consolidated into one drawing which you'll have to pay for unless the original truss manufacturer can be found and they are the generous sort (which they usually aren't).

    Trusses are just another example of newer not always being better and why I prefer the old-fashioned approach to most things

    Phil

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Hump in the floor - Truss pushed up

    Thanks for the responses, I will take these into consideration. Just to clarify, this is the truss that is built out of 2x4s, not a solid joist. These have a 2x8 nailed into them which I assume is to keep them from rising or sagging individually. Though, the person that installed this door frame, managed to raise this one, unless it was jammed in before the 2x8s, as these do not look like there were any movement in them. I understand that if this was a joist, I could remove the flooring to the bare joist and shave it down if needed, and brace it as well. But since I don't believe I can remove that much from the 2x4 top of this truss, I need another solution.

    If you are looking at the situation, you can see where the framing for the walls for the staircase are at one level, and the door frame is 3/4" taller than the wall framing. I will try and upload some pictures if I get a chance to, as this would make coming up with a solution easier
    Last edited by DisturbedMaynard; 01-29-2014 at 02:14 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,128

    Default Re: Hump in the floor - Truss pushed up

    Your description is quite good, but pics always help! Photo posting has been disabled on the site, but you can upload to a photo-sharing site and post the link to them here.

    One of the differences between a Pro and an amateur is that a Pro knows when to use a bigger hammer to make something fit, while an amateur just bashes away without understanding why the smaller hammer didn't work


    Phil

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