+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Recessed Medicine Cabinet

    Just need an opinion or two if what I'm doing is an acceptable procedure. I plan to install a partially recessed medicine cabinet on an exterior wall. There are is no wiring or plumbing in the way. I need to notch out one 2x6 stud. I plan to remove 2.5" of the stud, 30" high. This will leave 3" of the existing stud intact, which is almost equal to a 2x4 so I presume this will be ok. I plan to box in the opening with 2 x 6's, carring the top and bottom pieces over to the adjacent existing studs. I plan to install 3" of rigid insulation behind the cabinet, giving an R value greater or equal to the existing R19 fiberglass. I'll caulk around the insulation and install a moisture barrier over the surface and sides. Any thoughts on this, suggestions, etc.?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,385

    Default Re: Recessed Medicine Cabinet

    Notching 2-1/2" off a 2x6 stud is over the limit for an exterior wall stud. In your case, the limit is 25% of 5-1/2", which is 1-3/8" only.

    So you need another solution.

    If you notch 2-1/2" you will need to support the portion of the stud above the cabinet, with a 2x6 and a couple of 2x6 pieces from 1/2" plywood, sandwiched together and extending between the two adjacent studs, sitting with the 1-1/2"+1" side down under the notch, creating some kind of supporting header. Nail them to the studs.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Recessed Medicine Cabinet

    If I have to go to that trouble, wouldn't it be just as easy (or maybe easier) to remove the entire stud (from the bottom of the cabinet up) and put in a full header?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,942

    Default Re: Recessed Medicine Cabinet

    Yep,

    That's what I was thinking all along

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,963

    Default Re: Recessed Medicine Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by depawl View Post
    If I have to go to that trouble, wouldn't it be just as easy (or maybe easier) to remove the entire stud (from the bottom of the cabinet up) and put in a full header?
    Thing is, with a header, you have to have full support all the way to the floor under the header, you don't just toe-nail it into a little hole in the wall. Not saying that a header isn't the way to go or wouldn't be possible, just that it's going to take a lot bigger hole in the wall to install it.

    What about only cutting the stud by 25%, then make a surface spacer on the wall to take up the difference between the face of the wall and the trim ring of the cabinet? I've done this in a few cases where wall cavities were not deep enough to house the cabinet, it works well, it's fast and easy to do, and the finished results are nice too.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Recessed Medicine Cabinet

    Well I was thinking about that also. With a 1 3/8" notch out of the stud plus 1/2" sheetrock plus 3/8" tile would give me over 2" of recess on a 4" deep cabinet. Considering the alternative it may be the way to go.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,977

    Default Re: Recessed Medicine Cabinet

    Not all solutions are wrong- or right. I've been in similar situations, and if there is not a significant floor or roof load above the stud which was in my way I used a toe-nailed (actually I use screws) header above the opening I need with blocking under that on both sides if I can't get all the way to the sole plate with jacks. Not ideal but it works adequately.

    You can do this without a lot of extra sheetrock work too. Begin by cutting the sheetrock opening to finished size. Build the header and measure it's height. Cut both ends of the header at a slight inward vertical angle so you can twist it in place through the hole- about 3/8" narrower at the top on both sides is usually enough. (Here's the real trick): Locate the offending stud, mark the header height above the opening where that stud is, and carefully sawzall it off at that point being extra careful to not penetrate the other side wall surface. Twist the offending stud out. Insert the header, and once it's in position against the upper cut stud, toe-screw it into place through the drywall with 3 1/2" deck screws, 4 to a side. Do similarly to reattach the upper cut stud to the header Now block or add jacks below the header. For the bottom of the cut stud just block between like a purlin, using screws through the sheetrock as before. Now all you have to patch is one slot where you sawzall'ed and a few small holes where you screwed things together. That's a heck of a lot simpler and easier and cleaner than making a huge repair job if you don;t need to, and you end up with adequate support for everything even if it isn't optimum.

    Now if there's a large roof load or any floor above the stud in your way, file away what I just said and make it structurally correct with header and jacks properly fastened
    . For non-load bearing walls you can skip the full header and use a single 2X board instead. The short-cut method I use may not give you the strength needed for a large load but it works well otherwise and I've had no call-backs doing these this way for over 15 years. If I use quick-setting mud to finish the sheetrock I can be paint primed, cleaned up and out of there in under an hour, start to finish with less materials needed. In this business time is money and less material use matters. As long as it looks good, works good, and stays that way I can see no problem with it- can you?

    Phil
    Last edited by Mastercarpentry; 12-15-2013 at 03:43 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •