+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    104 monmouth way ,Clifton Park, NY 12065
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Pier and beam foundation, scratching my head...

    The work amount is too much and a contractor can't handle it better. Being a pest controller, I would suggest you pest control team. I am handling such projects with Stockton termite control team. Such conditions are fungus prone.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,776

    Default Re: Pier and beam foundation, scratching my head...

    In the first picture, I see OSB as a floor underlayment. Is this the floor of the addition? Without more detail, it looks like this beam is under the seam between the older part of the house and the addition. That would indicate that the section under the beam was where the original foundation of the house was located. The addition was added and the original foundation was butchered up so that the underside of the house could be accessed.

    If this is the case, then there is a load bearing wall above the beam and that is going to make things very difficult. Here is what I would do, and it is going to be very difficult and time consuming to do, first support the joists on both sides of the beam, and jack those supports up to level the floors if possible. You will need to put those support beams far enough away from the beam to allow your self working room between the temporary beams and the old beam, at least on one side.

    All of the piers need to come out along with the 2x8. Now cut the ends of the joists so there is a gap of about 4.5 inches between them. Slip three 2x10's up into the gaps and attach the joists to the 2x10's with joist hangers. Build piers at the ends of the 2x10's to support them in place. Since the total length is 18', one set of 8' 2x10's and one set of 10' 2x10's should do. The pier where the two sections meet will need to be 2 blocks wide (16"x16").

    When you are all done, this should keep the floor from sagging in this area for a long time and still provide access to the whole crawlspace. Consider using the setricon system for termite control, it is very effective.

    BTW, you could probably use three sections of three 2x8's six feet long each instead of the 2x10's. That would give you about 2 more inches of headroom but you will need to make another pier.
    Last edited by keith3267; 04-08-2014 at 01:47 PM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,661

    Default Re: Pier and beam foundation, scratching my head...

    Quote Originally Posted by jptsetme View Post
    I think the prevailing theory that this was once a sill plate and the foundation was removed makes a lot of sense. There are at least two rooms in the house that are obviously additions b/c behind the lathe on interior walls is old wooden siding. One of those two rooms is on the far side of the "beam" in question. It's a bit mind boggling to think that someone would remove part of the foundation of a house, but I'm seeing a handful of similarly surprising "techniques" in this home.
    Not all old houses were built on foundations. This could have been the original perimeter wall, built as you see it: posts and beams sitting on soil or if you're lucky, flat rocks.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,203

    Default Re: Pier and beam foundation, scratching my head...

    Quote Originally Posted by Fencepost View Post
    Not all old houses were built on foundations. This could have been the original perimeter wall, built as you see it: posts and beams sitting on soil or if you're lucky, flat rocks.
    In the hills around here, many old homes sit on the flattest rocks they could find in the local creek-bed, and Ive seen some that are stacked 16" to 20" high, but look like there's almost nothing making enough contact to keep them in place with the one underneath yet 80+ years on they're still doing the job and haven't shifted so how can you fault that? It still makes me uneasy though!

    Phil

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •